Author Topic: Genetic Memory?  (Read 3235 times)

Offline pharmaT

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Re: Genetic Memory?
« Reply #18 on: Tuesday 18 June 19 09:15 BST (UK) »
I can't answer how it may work but memories are neuropathways in the brain.  These pathways involve literal paths of neurones and release of neurotransmitters.  Both of which are genetically coded for. 
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Offline arthurk

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Re: Genetic Memory?
« Reply #19 on: Tuesday 18 June 19 11:29 BST (UK) »
I can't answer how it may work but memories are neuropathways in the brain.  These pathways involve literal paths of neurones and release of neurotransmitters.  Both of which are genetically coded for. 

Just to clarify (for a non-scientist), by "genetically coded for" are you saying that the neuropathways which relate to memory are somehow recorded in a person's DNA, so that they could in theory be inherited and reproduced in a descendant?

Just throwing something else in, I wonder if the question of genetic memory might be related to the nature vs nurture debate.

Studies of twins separated at birth often find a remarkable similarity in their interests, career paths, likes and dislikes etc, raising the question of how this comes about. As far as I know, our understanding of DNA is currently limited to its role in physical characteristics and susceptibility to disease etc. But are these non-physical things also literally in our DNA (as I think pharmaT might be saying about memory), or could there be some other mechanism involved, as yet undiscovered, which determines this kind of thing?

It could be a red herring, but I find myself drawn back to the question of migration: how is the urge or need to migrate passed on from one generation to the next (quite apart from the question of how they actually navigate etc)? I could be wrong, but aren't there some species where the young are not nurtured by their parents, so they don't have anyone to follow when migration time comes around? Eels? Some insects?
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Offline mowsehowse

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Re: Genetic Memory?
« Reply #20 on: Tuesday 18 June 19 13:08 BST (UK) »
"traumatic experiences can have an effect on a person's DNA, which can then be transmitted to future generations"

Really?  A human female is born with ovaries that already contain all the egg cells she will ever have.
Correct but!

Oogenesis is completed before birth so any traumatic experience she may undergo during her post-natal life cannot rewrite the DNA that is in them to reflect, let us say. an injured finger.
Oogenesis of her children's eggs takes place in her body at around 7 weeks of the development of their foetus.  Cheers, Guy

To put it another way.....
"Every female fetus, including your mom, developed all the eggs she will ever have while a fetus still inside of her own mom. And of course, one of those eggs ultimately developed into you. So in reality, you started your life inside of your grandmother."

https://www.tcoyf.com/fun-little-fact-mention-next-time-grandmas-dinner/

Which seems to make the idea of inherited memory a little more tenable I think.....

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Offline Gadget

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Re: Genetic Memory?
« Reply #21 on: Tuesday 18 June 19 14:19 BST (UK) »
Um.... you forget about meiosis   - what about dad?

PS - I totally agree with Erato on this.
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Offline Daisypetal

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Re: Genetic Memory?
« Reply #22 on: Tuesday 18 June 19 15:09 BST (UK) »

Hi,

I always wanted to call a daughter Emily, I didn't know anyone by that name but no other name seemed completely right. Twenty years later I found out that Emily is by far the most common female name in my family. :o

On my maternal side both Grandparents come from families of Emilys, Grand Cousins, Grand Aunts, Greatgrandmothers, they are everywhere :)

I had no knowledge of this previously. Why I wanted that name I'll never know.

Regards,
Daisy
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Offline Rosinish

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Re: Genetic Memory?
« Reply #23 on: Tuesday 18 June 19 15:26 BST (UK) »
RTL...

Although not 'genetic memory', Ian Hislop may have inherited something...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/whodoyouthinkyouare/past-stories/ian-hislop.shtml

I enjoyed that episode & have enjoyed the read...

Last line of last paragraph.

Annie
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Ireland:- Cullen, Flannigan (Derry), Donahoe/Donaghue (variants) (Cork), McCrate (Tipperary), Mellon, Tol(l)and (Donegal & Tyrone)

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Offline arthurk

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Re: Genetic Memory?
« Reply #24 on: Tuesday 18 June 19 15:50 BST (UK) »
How immutable is the DNA in the eggs a woman carries from birth? Aren't gene therapy, genetic engineering etc based on the idea that DNA can be altered? And if so, would/could that extend to the DNA in egg cells?
Researching among others:
Bartle, Bilton, Campbell, Craven, Emmott, Harcourt, Hirst, Kellet(t), Kennedy,
Meaburn, Mennile/Meynell, Metcalf(e), Palliser, Robinson, Rutter, Shipley, Stow, Wilkinson

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Offline Erato

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Re: Genetic Memory?
« Reply #25 on: Tuesday 18 June 19 16:08 BST (UK) »
"I can't answer how it may work but memories are neuropathways in the brain.  These pathways involve literal paths of neurones and release of neurotransmitters."

Well, sure, but so what?  The question is, how could some idea in a brain change the genetic code of a germ cell?  What would be the physical mechanism that would impart, let's say, a fondness for the name Emily into the DNA?
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Offline Rosinish

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Re: Genetic Memory?
« Reply #26 on: Tuesday 18 June 19 16:23 BST (UK) »
"Aren't gene therapy, genetic engineering
would/could that extend to the DNA in egg cells?"


Too complicated... 'genetic engineering' is treading on egg shells!

Annie
South Uist, Inverness-shire, Scotland:- Bowie, Campbell, Cumming, Currie, MacDonald, MacInnes, MacIntyre, MacKinnon, Steele, Walker

Ireland:- Cullen, Flannigan (Derry), Donahoe/Donaghue (variants) (Cork), McCrate (Tipperary), Mellon, Tol(l)and (Donegal & Tyrone)

Newcastle-on-Tyne/Durham (Northumberland):- Harrison, Jude, Kemp, Lunn, Mellon, Robson, Stirling

Kettering, Northampton:- MacKinnon

Canada:- Callaghan, MacKinnon, MacPhee

"OLD GENEALOGISTS NEVER DIE - THEY JUST LOSE THEIR CENSUS"