Author Topic: What's a "Tea basin"?  (Read 986 times)

Offline Erato

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Re: What's a "Tea basin"?
« Reply #18 on: Tuesday 09 July 19 22:42 BST (UK) »
They spoke of a 'dish' of tea in America, as well.

"I believe I forgot to tell you one Anecdote:  When I first came to this House it was late in the Afternoon, and I had ridden 35 miles at least.  “Madam” said I to Mrs. Huston, “is it lawfull for a weary Traveller to refresh himself with a Dish of Tea provided it has been honestly smuggled, or paid no Duties?”  "No sir, said she, we have renounced all Tea in this Place. I cant make Tea, but I'le make you Coffee.”  Accordingly I have drank Coffee every Afternoon since, and have borne it very well.  Tea must be universally renounced.  I must be weaned, and the sooner, the better."   John Adams to Abigail Adams, 1774
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Offline Skoosh

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Re: What's a "Tea basin"?
« Reply #19 on: Wednesday 10 July 19 07:01 BST (UK) »
Georgian tea caddies often had two compartments for teas & a round hole for a bowl (often missing!), the unconvincing explanation usually given for this is that it held a mixing-bowl to blend black & green tea. Why on earth would anybody need a mixing-bowl for tea which gets mixed in the teapot anyhow?  Possibly this was for this slop-bowl & as that was cleared away to the kitchen by the skivvy for washing explains the missing bowls?   ;D

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Offline Mckha489

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Re: What's a "Tea basin"?
« Reply #20 on: Wednesday 10 July 19 07:13 BST (UK) »
Without looking at google this is just a guess ...

I believe that coffee (and possibly tea as well after it was introduced into Britain) was drunk from something similar to what we know today as a cup and saucer, however I think that the cup may not have had a handle and the saucer was very deep. The liquid was poured from the cup into the saucer and then drunk from the saucer.


My grandmother and her sisters (all born 1880 to 1900) drank tea and coffee in this manner (out of the saucer) as late as the late 1960s. It used to fascinate me. Especially as we children were not allowed to copy them, and yet they seemed so polite!

Added.  They also made coffee with hot milk instead of hot water.  Ugh!
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Offline youngtug

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Re: What's a "Tea basin"?
« Reply #21 on: Wednesday 10 July 19 07:30 BST (UK) »
Georgian tea caddies often had two compartments for teas & a round hole for a bowl (often missing!), the unconvincing explanation usually given for this is that it held a mixing-bowl to blend black & green tea. Why on earth would anybody need a mixing-bowl for tea which gets mixed in the teapot anyhow?  Possibly this was for this slop-bowl & as that was cleared away to the kitchen by the skivvy for washing explains the missing bowls?   ;D

Skoosh.

I have a tea caddy, with the original mixing bowl, it is made of cut glass. Tea was blended to suit by the user, not by the seller. The chimps came later.
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Online Viktoria

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Re: What's a "Tea basin"?
« Reply #22 on: Wednesday 10 July 19 07:51 BST (UK) »
Thanks Mike. Couldn’t place it other than a Restoration play.

The receptacle you sent a photo of reminded me somewhat of those used by Gauchos in South America,except they need a sort of straw ,not attached.
Not ordinary tea.
If I have a second cup I like to empty and rinse my cup after the first.
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Offline CarolA3

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Re: What's a "Tea basin"?
« Reply #23 on: Wednesday 10 July 19 08:06 BST (UK) »
My grandmother and her sisters (all born 1880 to 1900) drank tea and coffee in this manner (out of the saucer) as late as the late 1960s. It used to fascinate me. Especially as we children were not allowed to copy them, and yet they seemed so polite!

My grandfather was born in 1900 and he did the same, but only when my grandmother wasn't looking.  If she caught him he'd be soundly rebuked for being 'common' :o

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Offline IgorStrav

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Re: What's a "Tea basin"?
« Reply #24 on: Wednesday 10 July 19 08:14 BST (UK) »
Slightly off topic (sorry), but this has reminded me of my father's habit of creating a 'nice, hot' second cup of tea by boiling up the metal teapot on the gas.

The resulting liquid looked as if it could act as brown dye.

Concentrated essence of tannin is what it tasted like (and was)!

Not refined at all, and much worse than drinking out of the saucer, which my grandmother I think also used to do, before the family told her it wasn't acceptable any more.....
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Online Viktoria

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Re: What's a "Tea basin"?
« Reply #25 on: Wednesday 10 July 19 08:28 BST (UK) »
Also a bit off topic,there was a street not far from our home in Manchester where very poor people lived .
I have related this story but it was why we went to the house.
One of our little friends from that street had drowned in the canal and was awaiting burial.
He was in his coffin in the living room  of a two up two down terrace house.
We his playmates ,used to go to see him,and the family would be having a meal and   them  using jam jars as cups.
My mother was aghast,I got into trouble for being such a little ghoul and very impolite into the bargain.
Imagine hot tea in a glass receptacle,not heatproof glass either.
A frequent saying near the pub was” are you coming in for a jar?”
Viktoria.


Offline IgorStrav

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Re: What's a "Tea basin"?
« Reply #26 on: Wednesday 10 July 19 08:31 BST (UK) »
Viktoria -

my son (who is old enough to know better) was complaining that when he made himself a cup of coffee to take on his train journey to work, it was too hot to hold.  It emerged that he was making it in an (ex-marmalade) glass jar.

I bought him a specially designed hot drink thermos flask.

In olden times?  No, last year.

Pay, Kent. 
Barham, Kent. 
Cork(e), Kent. 
Cooley, Kent.
Barwell, Rutland/Northants/Greenwich.
Cotterill, Derbys.
Van Steenhoven/Steenhoven/Hoven, Belgium/East London.
Burton, East London.
Barlow, East London
Wayling, East London
Wade, Greenwich/Brightlingsea, Essex.
Thorpe, Brightlingsea, Essex