Author Topic: What's a "Tea basin"?  (Read 987 times)

Offline GR2

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Re: What's a "Tea basin"?
« Reply #9 on: Tuesday 09 July 19 16:10 BST (UK) »
The key things about basins, according to the dictionary, is that they are circular and their width is greater than their depth. It doesn't specifically mention them as drinking vessels, but does give "A basin of tea" (1834) as an example of use. That usage certainly implies a drinking vessel rather than a slop basin. I have looked at the nine Georgian tea bowls in the house and they are all wider than they are deep. In comparison, all the cups with handles seem to have a width similar to their depth.

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Offline Erato

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Re: What's a "Tea basin"?
« Reply #10 on: Tuesday 09 July 19 16:34 BST (UK) »
"Tea Equipage in 18th Century America.  ...  Often a medium-sized bowl, usually hemispherical in shape, is to be seen on the tea table, and it is most likely a slop bowl or basin.  According to advertisements these bowls and basins were available in silver, pewter, and ceramic. Before a teacup was replenished, the remaining tea and dregs were emptied into the slop bowl. Then the cup might be rinsed with hot water and the rinsing water discarded in the bowl."

https://colonialquills.blogspot.com/2015/10/tea-equipage-in-18th-century-america.html
Wiltshire:  Banks, Taylor
Somerset:  Duddridge, Richards, Barnard, Pillinger
Gloucestershire:  Barnard, Marsh, Crossman
Bristol:  Banks, Duddridge, Barnard
Down:  Ennis, McGee
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Offline ThrelfallYorky

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Re: What's a "Tea basin"?
« Reply #11 on: Tuesday 09 July 19 17:00 BST (UK) »
... and I'm pretty sure exactly the same in Britain, Erato!
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Offline Erato

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Re: What's a "Tea basin"?
« Reply #12 on: Tuesday 09 July 19 17:24 BST (UK) »
"and I'm pretty sure exactly the same in Britain, Erato!"

I'm sure that's true.  The custom of drinking tea and the necessary equipment were mostly imported.  Indeed, in the years leading up to the Revolutionary War, tea drinking was a mark of loyalist, Tory sympathies.  The Boston Tea Party wasn't just a protest against the tax on tea but also against the aristocratic, tea-drinking English culture that was imposed on the people of the colonies.
Wiltshire:  Banks, Taylor
Somerset:  Duddridge, Richards, Barnard, Pillinger
Gloucestershire:  Barnard, Marsh, Crossman
Bristol:  Banks, Duddridge, Barnard
Down:  Ennis, McGee
Wicklow:  Chapman, Pepper
Wigtownshire:  Logan, Conning
Wisconsin:  Ennis, Chapman, Logan, Ware
Maine:  Ware, Mitchell, Tarr

Online Viktoria

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Re: What's a "Tea basin"?
« Reply #13 on: Tuesday 09 July 19 17:34 BST (UK) »
I remember the phrase”a dish of tea”, from a play,something like “ The School for Scandal” or “ The  Rivals”.
One of the characters asks another” Will you take a dish of tea?”
Mrs. Malaprop ?
Not absolutely sure though.
Viktoria


Offline Mike in Cumbria

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Como le dijo el mosquito a la rana, "Mas vale morir en el vino que vivir en el agua"

Online Maiden Stone

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Re: What's a "Tea basin"?
« Reply #15 on: Tuesday 09 July 19 19:40 BST (UK) »
Thanks, Mike. I'd envisaged a simple bowl.  Perhaps the men drank from the spout.
Cowban

Offline Mike in Cumbria

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Re: What's a "Tea basin"?
« Reply #16 on: Tuesday 09 July 19 21:35 BST (UK) »
Thanks, Mike. I'd envisaged a simple bowl.  Perhaps the men drank from the spout.
It does seem rather fancy for what is, in effect, a slop bucket.
Como le dijo el mosquito a la rana, "Mas vale morir en el vino que vivir en el agua"

Offline Mike in Cumbria

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Re: What's a "Tea basin"?
« Reply #17 on: Tuesday 09 July 19 21:40 BST (UK) »
I remember the phrase”a dish of tea”, from a play,something like “ The School for Scandal” or “ The  Rivals”.
One of the characters asks another” Will you take a dish of tea?”
Mrs. Malaprop ?
Not absolutely sure though.
Viktoria

It is a line from "Double Dealer" by William Congreve, 1694.
Como le dijo el mosquito a la rana, "Mas vale morir en el vino que vivir en el agua"