Author Topic: Transitioning to Surname Use  (Read 963 times)

Offline rpweedon

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Transitioning to Surname Use
« on: Thursday 25 July 19 12:03 BST (UK) »
Hello Rootschat,

I am examining late 1500 family wills.  My surname is Weedon.  However, in the mid 1500s I have several generations referring to themselves as 'A wedon'.  I am curious about the pre-fix 'A'.  Is this just a lazy way of saying 'John of Wedon' ... or is it literally saying 'John, a Wedon'?

Thoughts welcomed.

R. Peter Weedon
Canada
Weedon and variants

Offline Rosinish

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Re: Transitioning to Surname Use
« Reply #1 on: Thursday 25 July 19 12:50 BST (UK) »
It may be an idea to post a few examples for people to look at the context?

Annie
South Uist, Inverness-shire, Scotland:- Bowie, Campbell, Cumming, Currie

Ireland:- Cullen, Flannigan (Derry), Donahoe/Donaghue (variants) (Cork), McCrate (Tipperary), Mellon, Tol(l)and (Donegal & Tyrone)

Newcastle-on-Tyne/Durham (Northumberland):- Harrison, Jude, Kemp, Lunn, Mellon, Robson, Stirling

Kettering, Northampton:- MacKinnon

Canada:- Callaghan, Cumming, MacPhee

"OLD GENEALOGISTS NEVER DIE - THEY JUST LOSE THEIR CENSUS"

Offline rpweedon

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Re: Transitioning to Surname Use
« Reply #2 on: Thursday 25 July 19 12:58 BST (UK) »
Names are taken from will. 

In the body of will

Looke amonge the obligacons where yew shall fynde ... bill of covenaunts wth an obligacon for the answeringe unto the children as well the legacyes given unto them
by the foresaid John Awedon their father as also by Ellen their mother. their said mothers will followith in folio 247 the bill and obligacon ar[e] dated 6th February 1564.

Closing at end of will

John Awedon
Husbandman
Rickmansworth
1559


Hope this helps.


Weedon and variants

Offline Greensleeves

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Re: Transitioning to Surname Use
« Reply #3 on: Thursday 25 July 19 13:39 BST (UK) »
It could of course have been 'of Weedon' (a parish in Northamptonshire),  and then subsequently shortened to Awedon.  In those days not everyone was literate, spellings had not been standardised, and you had to rely on whoever was writing documents to use their skill and judgement to determine how your name was written.

I give as an example my maiden name of Sedgwick.  In the reign of Elizabeth I this was written as Seighwycke by one scribe, and Sidgwick by another.  The name went through various transitions (depending very much on the literacy and hearing ability of the writer).   Thus it ventured through Sidgwick to Shedwick, Cedric and Siggsworth, before it reverted to Sidgwick in the late 1800s -  where it remained until the careless pen of a parish clerk in the early 20th century changed it to Sedgwick.  And thus so far it has remained.

Regards
GS
Suffolk: Pearl(e),  Garnham, Southgate, Blo(o)mfield,Grimwood/Grimwade,Josselyn/Gosling
Durham/Yorkshire: Sedgwick/Sidgwick, Shadforth
Ireland: Davis
Norway: Torreson/Torsen/Torrison
Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk


Offline Vance Mead

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Re: Transitioning to Surname Use
« Reply #4 on: Thursday 25 July 19 16:34 BST (UK) »
I've seen A Mede or A Meade, which I think must be an abridged form of atte Mede.
Mead - Herts, Bucks, Essex
Pontifex - Bucks
Goldhurst - London, Middx, Herts
Kellogg/Kelhog - Essex, Cambs

Offline rpweedon

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Re: Transitioning to Surname Use
« Reply #5 on: Thursday 25 July 19 16:42 BST (UK) »
Sorry ... am too thick!

What does atte mean?

Peter
Weedon and variants

Offline Vance Mead

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Re: Transitioning to Surname Use
« Reply #6 on: Thursday 25 July 19 16:57 BST (UK) »
It means at or at the.

The Mead/Meade surname was atte Mede - at the meadow - until the early 1400s. A few surnames, like Atlee and Atwater, have retained it.
Mead - Herts, Bucks, Essex
Pontifex - Bucks
Goldhurst - London, Middx, Herts
Kellogg/Kelhog - Essex, Cambs

Offline rpweedon

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Re: Transitioning to Surname Use
« Reply #7 on: Thursday 25 July 19 17:00 BST (UK) »
okay ... got it.

Thanks.
Weedon and variants

Offline clayton bradley

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Re: Transitioning to Surname Use
« Reply #8 on: Thursday 25 July 19 19:57 BST (UK) »
Reaney and Wilson, Dictionary of English Surnames, gives Robert de Wedonia 1160 Northumberland and Ralph de Wedon 1207 Buckinghamshire as early examples, origin Weedon Buckinghamshire or Weedon Beck Northumberland.
Broadley (Lancs all dates and Halifax bef 1654)