Author Topic: Great-great grandfather's birth place  (Read 4974 times)

Offline Millmoor

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Re: Great-great grandfather's birth place
« Reply #27 on: Thursday 23 January 20 19:13 GMT (UK) »
Re Princess Street it is more likely a change of name.

See the enclosed link for an 1875 OS map where it is named.

https://maps.nls.uk/view/103313021
Dent (Haltwhistle and Sacriston), Bell and Jetson (Haltwhistle), Postle, Ward, Longstaff, Purvis, Manners, Parnaby and Hardy (Co. Durham), Kennedy and McRobert (Banffshire), Reid(Bathgate), Watson (Wemyss), Graham (Libberton), Sandilands (Carmichael), Munro (Dingwall)

Offline scottmathew

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Re: Great-great grandfather's birth place
« Reply #28 on: Thursday 23 January 20 19:16 GMT (UK) »
Re Princess Street it is more likely a change of name.

See the enclosed link for an 1875 OS map where it is named.

https://maps.nls.uk/view/103313021

Thank you.

Offline Tickettyboo

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Re: Great-great grandfather's birth place
« Reply #29 on: Thursday 23 January 20 20:19 GMT (UK) »
This hobby can be expensive (subs to genealogical sites, paying for certs etc)
As you seem to be reasonably new to this, I thought some general tips may be helpful (apologies if you are already aware of them)

1 Ancestry (and sometimes Find My Past) is often free to use at local libraries /archives etc. Obviously not as convenient as searching from home, but it can be a helpful option. Check your local library to see what is available at the library. No single online site covers everything, this is a way to find records that may not be available on whichever site you are subscribed to. Both sites sometimes have 'free access' weekends, keep an eye open for those.

2 Local archives if the archives of interest are within reasonable reach of where you live, they have a wealth of information that you can explore.

3 Family Search - if you find a transcription of a record, (such as the possible baptism I found for your William), then click the down arrow next to where it says Document information. That will give you the film number from which the barebones info was transcribed.Go to Search, then choose Catalogue. Select film or fiche number and put the film number in. If the results show a camera icon on the right hand side with a key symbol then the contract the LDS has with the record holders does not allow them to make the images available online. BUT If you can visit an LDS Family History Centre and use their pcs, you can view the original records. Again its not as convenient as searching from home but it can save you a LOT in subs etc.  I don't know if its widespread but my local FHC also has access to the sites like FindMyPast and Ancestry.

4 Read through the posts and replies on Rootschat, may not be about your family but seeing what others are stuck with and the replies which help means you learn more about what is available and where it can be found.

We all have budgets for our hobby, I will jump through hoops to find alternate sources without breaking the budget - sometimes all else fails and I have to resort to a more expensive option but not till I have explored other avenues.

Boo


Offline Tickettyboo

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Re: Great-great grandfather's birth place
« Reply #30 on: Thursday 23 January 20 20:32 GMT (UK) »
https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/60391/32966_635001_1922-00202?pid=408374&backurl=https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv%3D1%26dbid%3D60391%26h%3D408374%26tid%3D%26pid%3D%26usePUB%3Dtrue%26_phsrc%3DYDO7%26_phstart%3DsuccessSource&treeid=&personid=&hintid=&usePUB=true&_phsrc=YDO7&_phstart=successSource&usePUBJs=true&_ga=2.222629853.796759929.1579717730-574645298.1535194703

Note says Married, Husband left her 8 months ago.

I do have a sub to ancestry - though its .co.uk not.com. Your link doesn't work here.

Its taken me a while to de-construct it, but it appears to have been a link to a workhouse record in July 1866 for Rebecca Villette and her new born daughter Rebecca who was born in the workhouse. The notes say that Rebecca (senior)'s husband left her 8 months prior to this.
This would fit with the birth record that you found for the Rebecca Villette born Q3 1866

Boo


Offline scottmathew

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Re: Great-great grandfather's birth place
« Reply #31 on: Thursday 23 January 20 20:41 GMT (UK) »
1871 he is indexed on ancestry as Bullitt Villet
Can’t find it on Familysearch at the moment
Is with Uncle John HULL

Added - found it

https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VBXS-Q72

This is very interesting.

My great-great-grandfather William Villette (whose middle name was I think, "Pullete" after his father, from several sources it seems) is indeed indexed on the 1871 as "Pullit Villit" and is showing as having been born in London but now living in Gretton, Northamptonshire with his uncle John Hull (who would be the brother of Rebecca Villette, née Hull).

Another poster provided some information saying that my great-great grandfather's mother (the aforementioned Rebecca Hull) was, in 1866, living in a workhouse with a newly born and "ill" baby.  The baby died on August 11th, 1866. Her husband (and William Villette's father) Pullette is said as working as a "tailor".

Another user posted another link, which I could not access, which the poster said informs us that Rebecca Villette is "married", but that her husband had "left her 8 months ago."
This could possibly explain why my great-great grandfather William Villette had arrived in Northamptonshire by the time of the 1871 Census living with Rebecca Villette's brother John Hull?

@Ticketyboo - no information on any of the family history/ancestry websites have any information about Pulette Villette (my three-times great grandfather) - nothing about birth or death at all whatsoever. ONLY info is on the links we've got posted in this thread.

Now, I'm wondering if he was an immigrant from France. I've done some research (see here: https://sas-space.sas.ac.uk/6460/1/FrenchLondonKellyCornick.pdf) - there was a lot of French migrants to London in 1848 and again in the winter of 1851-52. I'm wondering if Pullette came over during one of these waves of migration - married Rebecca Hull - who then gave birth to my great-great grandfather William Villette as well as a daughter Rebecca who died in the workhouse - and then at some point perhaps went back to France. The pdf link above does say that many of the French migrants/refugees went back after a while due to "amnesty". Perhaps his possibly being born in France and then later moving back to and dying in France, is why no other records for him exist.

The pdf link also says that many of the French refugees found employment in London as tailors, which my great-great-great grandfather Pullette, it seems, was.

@Ticketyboo - what do you think? Does this "fit"?

Offline Tickettyboo

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Re: Great-great grandfather's birth place
« Reply #32 on: Thursday 23 January 20 20:42 GMT (UK) »
A sister

VILLETTE, REBECCA       HULL 
GRO Reference: 1866  S Quarter in MARYLEBONE  Volume 01A  Page 446


Mother and baby are ill and in Workhouse August.  Baby died 11th August
Address 3 North Street
Sep record says 7 Homer Row.


Baptism was 12 July 1866. Parents Pullette and Rebecca Villette. Abode York House
Pullette is a Tailor.

I've just looked at that baptism record, would be interested in another opinion as I believe it says the abode is Workhouse, not York House (though the W is very stylised)

and scottmathew, don't be too upset when you find that an ancestor is in the workhouse - especially to give birth or because they were ill. At one time the workhouses were the only avenue for any sort of medical care for everyday folk.Definitely not ideal by our standards but way better than no medical attention at all because you didn't have the money to pay.

Boo

Online mckha489

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Re: Great-great grandfather's birth place
« Reply #33 on: Thursday 23 January 20 20:45 GMT (UK) »
I think you are correct Boo, it is Workhouse.
Fits with the dates.  She discharged herself from the Workhouse on The 13th July. Went back in on the 1st August

Offline scottmathew

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Re: Great-great grandfather's birth place
« Reply #34 on: Thursday 23 January 20 20:49 GMT (UK) »
I think you are correct Boo, it is Workhouse.
Fits with the dates.  She discharged herself from the Workhouse on The 13th July. Went back in on the 1st August

@Mckha489 and @TicketyBoo - I really appreciate all this info. It means a lot to me. Thanks so much, guys.

TicketyBoo - It is very upsetting to think of one of my direct ancestors living in the workhouse. Especially with a baby who would die. But I understand the reasons people had to go there, which you have mentioned.

Offline [Ray]

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Re: Great-great grandfather's birth place
« Reply #35 on: Thursday 23 January 20 20:57 GMT (UK) »


Wasn't Villette the surname of the illegitimate son of Louis 13/14?
Where's my notes? [ Do not hold your breath ]
R
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