Author Topic: What is a "Neat Post Chaise"? 18th century  (Read 1332 times)

Offline fisherj

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What is a "Neat Post Chaise"? 18th century
« on: Tuesday 28 January 20 15:32 GMT (UK) »
The possessions of an ancestor of mine were auctioned after his death in 1791, Bath, England.

He was quite a prominent rough mason (builder) in the city. 

I do not have the auction catalogue but a newspaper item advertising the sale states that this included "a neat post chaise". 
 
I don't know whether that means a particular type of post chaise or whether the word "neat" means it was a nice one  ;D!

Also - I haven't been able to find out whether, if you had a post chaise in the 18th century, that meant you would carry post from town to town.  Or whether this was a vehicle used to carry post sometimes.   ???

Any thoughts?    ???

Please let me know if there are any on-line resources that can tell me more!!    ;)

Many thanks
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Bisley: Fisher
Eastcombe: Winstone
Chalford: Lambert
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Charfield: Fowler; Selman
Olveston: Fisher
Batheaston: Fisher
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Alresford: Sprangle; Hack
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Offline stanmapstone

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Re: What is a "Neat Post Chaise"? 18th century
« Reply #1 on: Tuesday 28 January 20 15:42 GMT (UK) »
"a neat post chaise" seems to be a common description according to Google.

Stan
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Offline Flattybasher9

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Re: What is a "Neat Post Chaise"? 18th century
« Reply #2 on: Tuesday 28 January 20 16:00 GMT (UK) »

Offline fisherj

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Re: What is a "Neat Post Chaise"? 18th century
« Reply #3 on: Tuesday 28 January 20 16:07 GMT (UK) »
Thanks for your replies - I had seen the Encyclopedia Britannica article - interesting - but I would still like to know the answers to my queries.  Many thanks
Woodmancote: Hobbs; Davison
Bisley: Fisher
Eastcombe: Winstone
Chalford: Lambert
Newent: Bowkett
Llangurig: Owen; Jones
Llangurig & Bedlinog: Rees
Llanonn: Williams
Charfield: Fowler; Selman
Olveston: Fisher
Batheaston: Fisher
Andover, Hurstbourne, Woodcutt, Shinfield: Farmer & Tanner
Alresford: Sprangle; Hack
Martletwy & Llangwig: Davies


Offline ThrelfallYorky

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Re: What is a "Neat Post Chaise"? 18th century
« Reply #4 on: Tuesday 28 January 20 16:35 GMT (UK) »
I'd assumed it was usually a private carriage, or possibly able to be hired, but a bit of an equivalent to a decent sports car, quite quick, possibly usually a bit showy, intended to impress.
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Offline arthurk

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Re: What is a "Neat Post Chaise"? 18th century
« Reply #5 on: Tuesday 28 January 20 16:36 GMT (UK) »
According to the OED (I have online access via my public library membership), the word 'neat' has quite a variety of meanings. The one given first, which has the earliest example of the word, is 'elegant' or 'well-made', so I suspect this will be the kind of thing that was meant here.

The entry for 'post-chaise' doesn't include the word 'neat', nor does 'neat' include 'post-chaise', so I don't think it will be referring to the type of carriage, but simply how they chose to describe it.
Researching among others:
Bartle, Bilton, Bingley, Campbell, Craven, Emmott, Harcourt, Hirst, Kellet(t), Kennedy,
Meaburn, Mennile/Meynell, Metcalf(e), Palliser, Robinson, Rutter, Shipley, Stow, Wilkinson

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Offline stanmapstone

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Re: What is a "Neat Post Chaise"? 18th century
« Reply #6 on: Tuesday 28 January 20 16:41 GMT (UK) »
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Offline Guy Etchells

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Re: What is a "Neat Post Chaise"? 18th century
« Reply #7 on: Tuesday 28 January 20 16:52 GMT (UK) »
I suggest that a neat post-chaise is a two horse post-chaise without the seating for footmen at the rear of the box.
It would the the gentleman's private transport of the 18/19th century.
It could even be the two-wheeled single horse type equivalent to a sports car.
Cheers
Guy
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Offline stanmapstone

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Re: What is a "Neat Post Chaise"? 18th century
« Reply #8 on: Tuesday 28 January 20 16:58 GMT (UK) »
Judging by the many entries in the Newspaper Archive "Neat Post Chaise" is a type of post chaise.
From Durham Chronicle 10 June 1826
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