Author Topic: Passing off grandchild as child  (Read 2177 times)

Offline Mark_Diamond

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Re: Passing off grandchild as child
« Reply #9 on: Monday 03 February 20 13:49 GMT (UK) »
It happened quite a lot.

I think the attitude of the family was two fold.

#1 The daughter has made a 'mistake' but she deserves a 2nd chance at a family.
#2 The child is better with us rather than ending up in Barnardos.
Brogan
Cassells
Diamond
Gillespie
Lennon
McConnell
McGowan
Prunty

Offline stanmapstone

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Re: Passing off grandchild as child
« Reply #10 on: Monday 03 February 20 14:10 GMT (UK) »
If a child was born at home and there was no medical attendant then all a 'parent' had to do was go and register the birth so in theory it would be quite easy for grandparents to be listed as the parents.

Not sure about England (someone else will know) but in Northern Ireland there are 2 types of birth certificate- a short one and a long one. The short one doesn't list parents so a child with only the short might never need to get the full certificate.

A new short form of birth certificate was introduced on 15th December 1947, costing 6d. It showed only the name and surname, sex, date of birth and (where possible) place of birth. There were no particulars of parentage or adoption. There had been a mistaken idea that the short certificate carried with it the stigma of illegitimacy, but that had almost entirely disappeared, and it was now in extensive use.
This is an example of a short birth certificate. ( notice the caution at the bottom)
Stan
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Online LizzieL

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Re: Passing off grandchild as child
« Reply #11 on: Monday 03 February 20 14:16 GMT (UK) »
Thank you Stan. This birth was 1944, so would have been a long certificate. 
Berks / Oxon: Eltham, Annetts, Wiltshire (surname not county), Hawkins, Pembroke, Partridge
Dorset / Hants: Derham, Stride, Purkiss, Sibley
Yorkshire: Pottage, Carr, Blackburn, Depledge
Sussex: Goodyer, Christopher, Trevatt
Lanark: Scott (soldier went to Jersey CI)
Jersey: Fowler, Huelin, Scott

Offline stanmapstone

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Re: Passing off grandchild as child
« Reply #12 on: Monday 03 February 20 14:44 GMT (UK) »
A new form was introduced in 1947, the short birth certificate was introduced by the 1874 Births and Deaths Registration Act. The date on the example I posted is 1936.

Stan
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Online LizzieL

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Re: Passing off grandchild as child
« Reply #13 on: Monday 03 February 20 14:52 GMT (UK) »
Thanks for clarifying Stan. In this instance whether the short form was issued in 1944 isn't really the issue. The man's son now has a long form, so knows who claimed to be the parents, but DNA results say otherwise.
Berks / Oxon: Eltham, Annetts, Wiltshire (surname not county), Hawkins, Pembroke, Partridge
Dorset / Hants: Derham, Stride, Purkiss, Sibley
Yorkshire: Pottage, Carr, Blackburn, Depledge
Sussex: Goodyer, Christopher, Trevatt
Lanark: Scott (soldier went to Jersey CI)
Jersey: Fowler, Huelin, Scott

Offline AntonyMMM

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Re: Passing off grandchild as child
« Reply #14 on: Monday 03 February 20 15:01 GMT (UK) »
It isn't an uncommon scenario, and wouldn't have been difficult to do (not impossible to do now either).

There are some quite well known examples - the guitarist Eric Clapton was one. He was born in Surrey in 1945, and didn't find out for some time that his older sister was actually his mother.

Offline Chris Doran

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Re: Passing off grandchild as child
« Reply #15 on: Monday 03 February 20 16:04 GMT (UK) »
Ií ve often wondered how someone would get away with pulling this trick in villages in the past. I have an ancestor whose last child was apparently baptised when Mum was 54! Thatís not impossible but itís very unlikely! But in a 18 and 19century village, I would have thought that everyone would know who was pregnant, and probably by whom, so how could they maintain this subterfuge?
Mother and daughter go off to a remote town for 6 months "to care for a sick relative" and return with child/grandchild.
Researching Penge, Anerley, (including the Crystal Palace) and neighbouring parts of Beckenham, currently in London (Bromley), formerly Surrey and/or Kent.

Offline Mart 'n' Al

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Re: Passing off grandchild as child
« Reply #16 on: Monday 03 February 20 16:15 GMT (UK) »
I wonder how many times Mother and daughter went off to a remote town for TEN months "to care for a sick relative" and return with child/grandchild...

Martin

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Re: Passing off grandchild as child
« Reply #17 on: Monday 03 February 20 16:17 GMT (UK) »
Sometimes it is not a case of Passing Off as it is referred to in these threads.

Sometimes a Census entry is not correct.

My Grandmother, her sister and two brothers are listed as daughters and sons on the census return with their Grandfather as the Head.

Their Mother had died and their Father away in the Army.