Author Topic: When to go to hospital  (Read 2441 times)

Offline Spidermonkey

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Re: When to go to hospital
« Reply #9 on: Saturday 18 April 20 11:16 BST (UK) »
They specifically say that you do not need to take your temperature with a thermometer: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/symptoms-and-what-to-do/

a high temperature Ė this means you feel hot to touch on your chest or back (you do not need to measure your temperature)

Offline jc26red

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Re: When to go to hospital
« Reply #10 on: Saturday 18 April 20 12:00 BST (UK) »
I wonder what 111 says if like me you do not have a thermometer.

Same as they told my Dad!
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Offline bykerlads

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Re: When to go to hospital
« Reply #11 on: Saturday 18 April 20 12:05 BST (UK) »
At the start of the virus crisis we too  had no thermometer. Never have had one.
None to be had locally in shops , so ordered one online. After 3 weeks one arrived, ironically it was made in China and apparently sent from there too.
We put it into 7 days quarantine as a precaution.

I still feel it is worth questioning the Covid pre-hospital admission screening online and via 111. Is its severity actually causing more deaths due to delay in getting treatment?
I wonder what the systems are in other countries?


Offline groom

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Re: When to go to hospital
« Reply #12 on: Saturday 18 April 20 12:47 BST (UK) »
Quote
Can anyone tell us how we should go about getting hospital (ie life-saving) treatment for corvid. Surely we can ring 999 or go to a hospital?

I think even if you do that, you could still be refused admittance if you don't reach their criteria. There was a man on the news the other day who was told by his GP to go to the hospital, but when he got there they told him to go home. It was only after a couple more days and the direct action of the doctor that he was admitted and went straight to ICU. Luckily he recovered.

It does sound very much as if there is no treatment apart from the oxygen and that is why there is no point going to hospital until you need to be given that.
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Offline avm228

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Re: When to go to hospital
« Reply #13 on: Saturday 18 April 20 13:06 BST (UK) »
I had to take my elderly Dad to a London hospital this week due to his severe and worsening breathlessness. They were amazing. No delay - they immediately identified his low oxygen sats level in the (empty) waiting area, and rushed him through for urgent assessment in A&E. They were very clear that seeking urgent help was the right thing to do and people must not be reluctant to seek medical attention for dangerous conditions.

I was not allowed to go in with him, but the staff were great and kept me updated on his condition by phone.

His chest x-ray showed lung signs consistent with Covid but which could have been caused by another condition. He was not swabbed for Covid because they only swab people who are admitted. Once his oxygen sats had stabilised they explained to me that they were not admitting him as if he didnít already have the virus he would catch it there. Instead he is being actively monitored by hospital staff at home, with home visits every other day and phone calls in between.
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Offline groom

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Re: When to go to hospital
« Reply #14 on: Saturday 18 April 20 15:03 BST (UK) »
That sounds as if he had excellent treatment, I hope that he is well on the way to recovery now. The not testing does seem a bit silly to me - how will he ever know if he had it or not unless later everyone is tested for antibodies? Why not just test everyone who presents with symptoms, then at least we might have more accurate data. 
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Offline BushInn1746

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Re: When to go to hospital
« Reply #15 on: Saturday 18 April 20 15:40 BST (UK) »
Low oxygen saturation level in the blood (Hypoxemia) is one indication of a breathing or circulation condition. All the best avm228 and All.

I found NHS 111 absolutely excellent! I was assessed and went into A & E straight away when my B.P., went up high (on my home monitor), 210/120 at hospital. That can be Stroke territory, but reduced to a max safe level and was home late the same day after several tests.

Offline BushInn1746

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Re: When to go to hospital
« Reply #16 on: Saturday 18 April 20 16:19 BST (UK) »
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Offline bykerlads

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Re: When to go to hospital
« Reply #17 on: Saturday 18 April 20 16:19 BST (UK) »
There seem to be some blood oxygen level monitors available for use at home, just clip them onto your finger.
Are these any use/reliable?