Author Topic: Qualification Physick  (Read 561 times)

Offline Gordon163

  • RootsChat Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 184
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Qualification Physick
« on: Thursday 07 May 20 14:00 BST (UK) »
Hi,

I've just found the 1763 baptismal record of a 4th gt-grandmother, in Ross-on-Wye. It says that her father was a 'bachelor of Physick (sic)'.

I am thinking that, as it was in the 18th century, he was probably a physician, rather than a physicist; the qualification, it would seem, probably coming from Oxford, as London was not founded until c1830. 

Any opinions on this wouod be most welcome.

Thanks,

Gordon

Offline stanmapstone

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 25,798
    • View Profile
Re: Qualification
« Reply #1 on: Thursday 07 May 20 14:07 BST (UK) »
I think  Physick means Natural science, or a general branch of science. according to the OED

The scope of the term has varied from including the whole of the physical world (Locke also included God, angels, etc.) to being restricted to inorganic bodies, until finally being further restricted to sense
Stan
Census Information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Offline Gordon163

  • RootsChat Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 184
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Qualification Physick
« Reply #2 on: Friday 08 May 20 17:28 BST (UK) »
Thanks Stan,

That seems to be highly likely.

Kind regards,

Gordon

Offline teragram31510

  • RootsChat Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 161
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Qualification Physick
« Reply #3 on: Friday 08 May 20 18:41 BST (UK) »
Hello,

 <<It says that her father was a 'bachelor of Physick (sic)'.>>

I have always understood that such a qualification in the 17th/18th centuries would have meant the man was a medical practitioner, a physician, as you say.

Margaret





Somerset: Poole, Hutchings/Hutchin(s), Harvey/Harvie, Bullen


Offline stanmapstone

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 25,798
    • View Profile
Re: Qualification Physick
« Reply #4 on: Friday 08 May 20 18:53 BST (UK) »
Hello,
 <<It says that her father was a 'bachelor of Physick (sic)'.>>
I have always understood that such a qualification in the 17th/18th centuries would have meant the man was a medical practitioner, a physician, as you say.
Margaret

It can mean either, according to the OED, depending on the context,

The art or practice of healing; the medical profession. Now archaic.
or
5. Natural science. Cf. physics n. 1a. Obsolete.

Stan
Census Information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Offline Gordon163

  • RootsChat Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 184
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Qualification Physick
« Reply #5 on: Saturday 09 May 20 10:39 BST (UK) »
Hi

The following extract from the Royal College of Physicians (RCP) indicates that Oxford University was awarding a bachelor of physick qualification in the 18th Century:

"We, the President and three of the Elects of the College of Physicians, London, have, according to Act of Parliament and in obedience to his Excellency the Lord High Admiral of England, examined Mr. Abraham Carslake, bachelor of physick, in the university of Oxford, and do approve of him as duly qualified to serve Her Majesty as a Physician in Her Majesty’s fleet.
Witness our hands Mar. 10, 1708."

William Munk"

Regards,

Gordon