Author Topic: Very quick query... London Docker wage  (Read 806 times)

Offline MrsS2012

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Very quick query... London Docker wage
« on: Sunday 10 May 20 11:23 BST (UK) »
Trying to find out how much roughly a London Docker would have earned on the 1930s/40s.
I've found a few good websites which describe conditions and working hours and mentions wages for the 19th century but nothing for the period I'm looking for.
Does anyone know?

Offline mckha489

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Re: Very quick query... London Docker wage
« Reply #1 on: Sunday 10 May 20 11:50 BST (UK) »
10 October 1945 - Liverpool Echo - Liverpool, Lancashire, England

And many other articles

Offline mckha489

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Re: Very quick query... London Docker wage
« Reply #2 on: Sunday 10 May 20 11:54 BST (UK) »
They may have varied according to the port?  There is a report of settlement of Dundee Dockers wage increase in 1937

13s  4d for 8 hours

1935 headlines say “Dockers Wage Cut to be Restored”
1939 Glasgow want wages increased fro 13s to 16s, the union having negotiated for 14s

Someone must have written a thesis about all this.

Offline MrsS2012

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Re: Very quick query... London Docker wage
« Reply #3 on: Sunday 10 May 20 11:59 BST (UK) »
That's really useful thank you both of you!
I wonder what a 'blue eye' is? I'll have too look that up!


Offline MrsS2012

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Re: Very quick query... London Docker wage
« Reply #4 on: Sunday 10 May 20 12:00 BST (UK) »
That's really useful thank you both of you!
I wonder what a 'blue eye' is? I'll have too look that up!

Just looked it up... Means favourite

Offline Crumblie

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Re: Very quick query... London Docker wage
« Reply #5 on: Sunday 10 May 20 12:39 BST (UK) »
That's really useful thank you both of you!
I wonder what a 'blue eye' is? I'll have too look that up!

Just looked it up... Means favourite

As in blue eyed boy, or girl perhaps but I can't remember ever hearing that. Don't forget that the docks were a closed shop and it was a case of who you knew and not what you knew.

Offline MrsS2012

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Re: Very quick query... London Docker wage
« Reply #6 on: Sunday 10 May 20 14:01 BST (UK) »

[/quote]

As in blue eyed boy, or girl perhaps but I can't remember ever hearing that. Don't forget that the docks were a closed shop and it was a case of who you knew and not what you knew.
[/quote]

Was it really? My grandad worked at the East India Docks in London. Looking back it seemed to be quite a common profession on that side of the family.

Offline 3473peter

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Re: Very quick query... London Docker wage
« Reply #7 on: Monday 11 May 20 14:50 BST (UK) »
A blue eye boy was classed as a favourite person whom the foreman would chose either because he was a family member or a good reliable hard worker or bought the foreman a drink or supplied a service others would not! = favouritism = the practice of giving unfair preferential treatment to one person or group at the expense or another. This happened a lot when in the early days of the London royal docks when all Dockers/stevedores were on piece work and had to line up each morning to get a days work, chosen by the foreman. Most dock work was kept in the family right up to the late 70s early 80s when the container ships entered tilbury and other large docks around the country and many dock workers lost their jobs as manual handling was not required for unloading/loading ships anymore. A lot of my family and friends lost their jobs, most taking early retirement. I remember as a boy in the 60s watching ships being unloaded and loaded in the royal docks around silvertown and north Woolwich and the pubs were plenty and always full, good memories. I hope to ask what wages were paid to dockers in the 30s/40s when a old friend of mine worked in the royal docks as a union steward replies. good luck.

Offline MrsS2012

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Re: Very quick query... London Docker wage
« Reply #8 on: Monday 11 May 20 19:57 BST (UK) »
That's really interesting Peter, thank you.
My grandfather was a Docker from at least the age of 17 and he worked at the docks right up until retirement. His father was a Docker before him.
They worked at the East India Docks and later on my grandfather worked at Tilbury Docks =)