Author Topic: Grants and Will  (Read 641 times)

Offline zetlander

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Re: Grants and Will
« Reply #9 on: Wednesday 20 May 20 14:44 BST (UK) »
Just phoned the relevant Registry Office.
Not much the wiser!

I think that what happens if someone dies intestate the next-of-kin applies for a Letter of Administration (from a Solicitor??)
This Letter of Administration permits the next-of-kin to distribute the persons monies etc. 
(I guess that usually the next-of-kin would be the closest relative and therefore the main beneficiary.)
In this case the deceased was an only child, never had any children and both her parents were dead so any relative is a distant one.  I called her 'aunt' but in fact she was a second cousin to my mother.  I think there will be many distant relatives like myself.
Not after her money - curious to know who sorted out her estate - honest!
Thanks.


















Offline CaroleW

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Re: Grants and Will
« Reply #10 on: Wednesday 20 May 20 15:11 BST (UK) »
I am classed as next of kin to an elderly former neighbour at his request,  and am also executor of his eventual estate which will be very substantial.  However - I am not related in any way and am not a beneficiary of his will as everything goes to a named charity.

If he were to die intestate - he has absolutely no living relatives so I could possibly apply for a grant of administration.  However,  with no living relatives on his side - it's possible his estate would pass to the Crown regardless of me knowing he wants it all to go to a specific charity.

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Offline arthurk

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Re: Grants and Will
« Reply #11 on: Wednesday 20 May 20 16:36 BST (UK) »
Assuming this is England and Wales:

I think that what happens if someone dies intestate the next-of-kin applies for a Letter of Administration (from a Solicitor??)
The Grant (or Letters) of Administration are issued by the Probate Office. A lot of people make their application with the help of a solicitor, though this isn't essential. However, if there isn't a will, administering the estate would involve tracking down all entitled relatives, and not everyone feels up to doing that themselves.

Quote
This Letter of Administration permits the next-of-kin to distribute the persons monies etc. 
(I guess that usually the next-of-kin would be the closest relative and therefore the main beneficiary.)
Or possibly one of the main beneficiaries - if there were several relatives who were equally closely related, such as a set of siblings, it might be that one of them applied for Administration, but they would each get an equal share.

Quote
In this case the deceased was an only child, never had any children and both her parents were dead so any relative is a distant one.  I called her 'aunt' but in fact she was a second cousin to my mother.  I think there will be many distant relatives like myself.
In England and Wales, a second cousin doesn't inherit in intestacy cases. Entitlement goes as far as first cousins, plus their descendants. (I believe the net spreads wider in Scotland.)

Quote
Not after her money - curious to know who sorted out her estate - honest!
The only way to find that out would be to order a copy of the grant. It should say who it was issued to - worth a try at 1.50?
Researching among others:
Bartle, Bilton, Campbell, Craven, Emmott, Harcourt, Hirst, Kellet(t), Kennedy,
Meaburn, Mennile/Meynell, Metcalf(e), Palliser, Robinson, Rutter, Shipley, Stow, Wilkinson

Census information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk


Offline Tickettyboo

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Re: Grants and Will
« Reply #12 on: Wednesday 20 May 20 17:44 BST (UK) »
Like others who have replied I have only ever dealt with 'Probate' i.e. when the deceased left a will and named executors, which would result in both a copy Will AND the Grant of Administration. I have never been involved with an estate for anyone who died intestate - which would only have a Grant of Administration.

https://www.gov.uk/applying-for-probate/who-can-apply
Scroll down to the section headed
If a person did not leave a will

and that says (at least currently) that there are firm rules about who can apply for admin of an estate.

From what you have said none of the listed relationships are likely to have existed for your 'aunt'
so  if it were me (who is terminally nosey) I'd be forking out the 1.50 for a copy of the Grant of Administration to see who was the grantee :-)

I'd doubt the grant would tell you anything other than the name and address of the grantee and the declared gross and net value of the estate, but you never know there 'may' have been a family connection, no matter how remote

Its possible that it was previously published on the Bona Vacantia lists?

Boo


Offline zetlander

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Re: Grants and Will
« Reply #13 on: Thursday 21 May 20 11:47 BST (UK) »
Like others who have replied I have only ever dealt with 'Probate' i.e. when the deceased left a will and named executors, which would result in both a copy Will AND the Grant of Administration. I have never been involved with an estate for anyone who died intestate - which would only have a Grant of Administration.

https://www.gov.uk/applying-for-probate/who-can-apply
Scroll down to the section headed
If a person did not leave a will

and that says (at least currently) that there are firm rules about who can apply for admin of an estate.

From what you have said none of the listed relationships are likely to have existed for your 'aunt'
so  if it were me (who is terminally nosey) I'd be forking out the 1.50 for a copy of the Grant of Administration to see who was the grantee :-)

I'd doubt the grant would tell you anything other than the name and address of the grantee and the declared gross and net value of the estate, but you never know there 'may' have been a family connection, no matter how remote

Its possible that it was previously published on the Bona Vacantia lists?

Boo
thanks -
yes, have sent for a copy of the Grant.  I called the person in question 'aunt' and she was a very distant relation.  I'm just curious to see who administered her Estate.

Offline Little Nell

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Re: Grants and Will
« Reply #14 on: Friday 22 May 20 10:55 BST (UK) »
It might be worth searching for a notice in The Gazette to see if a notice was placed inviting anyone with a possible interest in her estate (perhaps as a creditor) to get in touch with X.

This would be the relevant area to search:

https://www.thegazette.co.uk/wills-and-probate

A relative died intestate in the 1990s and the grant of administration was issued in the names of his divorced wife and another relative (who was a cousin).  The administration of the estate was limited for the use and benefit of his child, who was a minor when this relative died. 

Nell
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Offline zetlander

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Re: Grants and Will
« Reply #15 on: Saturday 23 May 20 11:09 BST (UK) »
Assuming this is England and Wales:

I think that what happens if someone dies intestate the next-of-kin applies for a Letter of Administration (from a Solicitor??)
The Grant (or Letters) of Administration are issued by the Probate Office. A lot of people make their application with the help of a solicitor, though this isn't essential. However, if there isn't a will, administering the estate would involve tracking down all entitled relatives, and not everyone feels up to doing that themselves.

Quote
This Letter of Administration permits the next-of-kin to distribute the persons monies etc. 
(I guess that usually the next-of-kin would be the closest relative and therefore the main beneficiary.)
Or possibly one of the main beneficiaries - if there were several relatives who were equally closely related, such as a set of siblings, it might be that one of them applied for Administration, but they would each get an equal share.

Quote
In this case the deceased was an only child, never had any children and both her parents were dead so any relative is a distant one.  I called her 'aunt' but in fact she was a second cousin to my mother.  I think there will be many distant relatives like myself.
In England and Wales, a second cousin doesn't inherit in intestacy cases. Entitlement goes as far as first cousins, plus their descendants. (I believe the net spreads wider in Scotland.)

Quote
Not after her money - curious to know who sorted out her estate - honest!
The only way to find that out would be to order a copy of the grant. It should say who it was issued to - worth a try at 1.50?

thanks for your reply.
I received a copy of the Grant (2 days after applying for it!)

My late 'aunt' had 15 X first cousins - 14 had predeceased her. The only survivor was 95 years old !!and the Letter of Administration was granted to her daughter who I assume had Power of Attorney.
The surviving cousin died 6 months after my 'aunt.'
I guess had this cousin not been alive then the Estate would have gone to the Government.

Offline arthurk

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Re: Grants and Will
« Reply #16 on: Saturday 23 May 20 11:33 BST (UK) »
That was quick! It sounds quite an interesting situation - though actually I think the estate would have been shared between all 15 first cousin lines, and for the ones who had died, their descendants. (But I'm not a lawyer, so don't take this as definite.)
Researching among others:
Bartle, Bilton, Campbell, Craven, Emmott, Harcourt, Hirst, Kellet(t), Kennedy,
Meaburn, Mennile/Meynell, Metcalf(e), Palliser, Robinson, Rutter, Shipley, Stow, Wilkinson

Census information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Offline Tickettyboo

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Re: Grants and Will
« Reply #17 on: Saturday 23 May 20 12:01 BST (UK) »
Pleased you got the info you were looking for and quickly too! :-)

Boo