Author Topic: Women emigrants last ship.  (Read 414 times)

Offline keith110639

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Women emigrants last ship.
« on: Saturday 23 May 20 13:31 BST (UK) »
In a a press cutting about a ancestor (who was had been a mariner in the late 1800's) on his 90th birthday it said he had been on the ship that took the last of the women emigrants to Australia to be brides of convicts. Does anyone know the name of this ship or where I could find it please

Online cath151

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Re: Women emigrants last ship.
« Reply #1 on: Saturday 23 May 20 22:39 BST (UK) »
Hi
I found the piece in the newspapers and it would appear William was at sea for seven years from approx 1861 to 1868, afterwards he became a fireman.
So the ship would be around that time and sailed into Fremantle with "Government assisted emigrants".
There was a ship called the Hougoumont that is mentioned on google to be the last/one of the last ships carrying emigrants to Freemantle in 1868 but no mention of women specifically.
It sounds like he had an interesting life.
A bit of possibly helpful info  https://www.wltribune.com/community/haphazard-history-the-bride-ships-of-europe/   

Cathy
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Offline majm

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Re: Women emigrants last ship.
« Reply #2 on: Sunday 24 May 20 02:23 BST (UK) »
 :)  :)

I cannot find any mention of any females or of any government assisted emigrants being passengers onboard that voyage of the Hougoumont to Western Australia.  I can find names of passengers including females on the return voyage departing WA 4 Feb 1868. 


http://www.sro.wa.gov.au/archive-collection/collection/convict-records

Transportation of convicts to Western Australia ceased in 1868 as a result of a reassessment of British home policy, with the last convict ship to Australia, the Hougoumont, arriving in the Swan River Colony on 10 January 1868 with 229 convicts aboard.

No female convicts were transported to Western Australia.

http://members.iinet.net.au/~perthdps/convicts/con-wa42.html  This is the list of those men transported per the Hougoumont.
https://convictrecords.com.au/ships/hougoumont/1867  Primary Source : AJCP microfilm Roll/reel 93 … HO11/19
https://www.rootschat.com/forum/index.php?topic=829521.0  Thread on the AJCP – see https://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-728075871/findingaid Archival History re HO11 and Reel 93.

https://fremantlestuff.info/ships/hougoumont.html 
Journals of three of the Fenians have been published: those of Denis Cashman, John Casey, and Thomas McCarthy Fennell.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/3749594 Perth Gazette etc 20 Dec 1867.
https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/69386550 Inquirer & Comm-News 5 Feb 1868
https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/110068349 Herald 8 Feb 1868 … passengers departing WA for Madras via Champion Bay  (so following the WA coast northwards).  Cabin Passengers Mrs Brockman and 2 children,  Dr Smith,  Mr Mitchell;  in steerage Mr and Mrs Frogatt and 4 children,  P Brien, A Donoghue, E Peevar,  W Woods and T Chambers.  Cargo 40 horses, 7 Rams.

May I ask for details of the newspaper please...
... the piece in the newspapers and it would appear William was at sea for seven years from approx 1861 to 1868, afterwards he became a fireman.
So the ship would be around that time and sailed into Fremantle with "Government assisted emigrants".....
and
In a a press cutting about a ancestor (who was had been a mariner in the late 1800's) on his 90th birthday it said he had been on the ship that took the last of the women emigrants to Australia to be brides of convicts. Does anyone know the name of this ship or where I could find it please

There were many immigration schemes, bringing females to the colonies in the middle of the nineteenth century.  But there were also female convicts.  Convictism effectively ceased to New South Wales in 1840 and to Van Diemens Land (Tasmania) in the mid 1850s.   About 25,000 were females. (about 12,000 to NSW and 13,000 to VDL).   
https://www.nla.gov.au/research-guides/convicts/female-convicts

Emigration Schemes
https://sydneylivingmuseums.com.au/convict-sydney/female-migration
Bounty Emigration Ships https://www.rushen.com.au/bounty-emigration-ships

Caroline Chisholm http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/chisholm-caroline-1894


JM
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Offline jomcd967

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Puplett, Sonnex, Lott, Dunkiss, Hart - London area.
Hudson, Jenner, Dedman - Sussex
Leach, Hopkins, Saunders - Wales
Leach, Lipscombe - Hampshire
Sipthorpe - Lancashire
Walters - Cornawall & Australia
Kingshott, Matheson, Pitt, McDonald, Keogh - Australia.

Offline jomcd967

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Re: Women emigrants last ship.
« Reply #4 on: Sunday 24 May 20 03:29 BST (UK) »
This lists the Tartar arriving in 1863.....
https://yardworks.wordpress.com/tag/bride-ships/

Puplett, Sonnex, Lott, Dunkiss, Hart - London area.
Hudson, Jenner, Dedman - Sussex
Leach, Hopkins, Saunders - Wales
Leach, Lipscombe - Hampshire
Sipthorpe - Lancashire
Walters - Cornawall & Australia
Kingshott, Matheson, Pitt, McDonald, Keogh - Australia.

Offline keith110639

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Re: Women emigrants last ship.
« Reply #5 on: Sunday 24 May 20 09:08 BST (UK) »
Hi Cath151, I have a copy of the newspaper about William, he was a cousin of my Great Grandfather John Henry Vine who was a Master mariner. William started his life as a seaman at the age of 14. Just trying to find out a bit more about the ships he was on. I will look at the links,
Thanks

Offline keith110639

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Re: Women emigrants last ship.
« Reply #6 on: Sunday 24 May 20 09:20 BST (UK) »
MAJM, William Chatterton’s life at sea and in the Fire Brigade.

Derby Evening Telegraph March 25th 1938 when he celebrated his 90th birthday.
Born at Spalding, Lincolnshire, an inherent spirit of adventure was in evidence from his early days. When he was 13 he ran away to sea, and for a year worked on different sailing ships voyaging between English ports. At the end of this period, he took a big chance and signed on in a merchantman bound for India. For seven years he sailed the Seven Seas before the mast and visited almost every country of the world, as he puts it. In Calcutta, a few years after the Indian Mutiny, he was witness to the scenes of terror which followed reprisals against the mutineers. In Madras he saw the last procession of the dreaded Juggernaut car, although on this occasion cordons of armed militia prevented frenzied natives from throwing themselves to a terrible death beneath its spiked wheels. To Freemantle, premier port of Western Australia, he sailed in a windjammer with the last ship-load of Government sponsored emigrants, women sent out to become brides of convicts in the penal settlements of the Antipodes.
William might well have become a policeman instead of a fireman. While in Australia he and three other sailors temporarily deserted ship and tried to enlist in the Australian police force. They were told to get back to their boat and they did.
One day when he had returned to London after a foreign voyage, Mr. Chatterton decided to join one of the London fire brigades. It might seem a strange step, from sailor to fireman, but in those days sailors stood a far better chance of enrolment in a fire brigade on account of their experience in climbing!
He made his application and was accepted, and for the next 28 years was on duty at every important outbreak of fire in the London area. On the very day of the Alhambra fire he was appointed an officer, following two years’ service on the River Thames Fire Float.
When fire broke out in the old Alhambra Theatre, Leicester Square London in 1882, all the resources of London’s fire brigades were concentrated in an effort to save the building. Working feverishly in one room three firemen heard a shout of warning, and then a ceiling collapsed, burying them. One of the men, badly injured, struggled to release his comrades, without success. His strength exhausted, he collapsed. When he was found they thought he was dead, He was not, however, and yesterday he celebrated his 90th birthday. As a result of injuries suffered in the Alhambra blaze, he was ill, although he was quickly able to resume work. His two companions were less fortunate, they died. He had many narrow escapes during his career in London, and risked his life on innumerable occasions
He was one of the most important officers of the Metropolitan Fire Brigade when he decided to accept the appointment with the Midland Railway. He then held the rank or Superintendent. His first task when he came to Derby was the reorganisation of all the railway company’s fire brigades. This took him four years, but it was worth it, he thinks.
Mr. Chatterton saw vast changes in the methods of fire-fighting and in the course of his work in London and Derby, and in some of these changes he himself played a big part.
When he first joined the London Brigade all the pumping was done by hand by the crowds of spectators, who worked in relays, their energy sustained by gallon of beer!
Mr. Chatterton was the first man to perfect a chemical extinguisher and this he achieved while he was at Derby. His first extinguisher was a crude affair and was worked by the action of acid on bicarbonate of soda. But it worked, and has since been elaborated. William died on the 21st March 1946 age 95.

Offline Dundee

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Re: Women emigrants last ship.
« Reply #7 on: Sunday 31 May 20 05:08 BST (UK) »
To Freemantle, premier port of Western Australia, he sailed in a windjammer with the last ship-load of Government sponsored emigrants, women sent out to become brides of convicts in the penal settlements of the Antipodes.

Possibly a bit of creative thinking there by someone who thought we were all still convicts.

William CHATTERTON was admitted to the Dreadnought Seamen's Hospital on 14 Oct 1867 with scurvy.  He was aged 22, born Spalding, AB, 5'5", sailed out of London, 8 years in the merchant service, discharged on 28 Oct, convalescent.  His ship was named Bride.  His age and years of service are not correct, he was still at home in 1861.

Assuming he was was admitted soon after a voyage, then possibly this is his voyage to WA arriving 2 Jan 1867.

Bride, 546 tons, Captain H. T. Grigg, from London with general cargo. Passengers - Mrs. R. King and 2 daughters, A. C. G. Eichbaum, wife and family (5) in cabin, and 68 steerage passengers. Date of departure 29th September, 95 days out.

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/3753202

The steerage passengers were a mix of single males and females and families.  To find the passenger list on Ancestry you have to choose a departure year of 1866 in the WA passenger lists as the document was compiled upon departure, not arrival.

Imports listed here

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/69384101

Imports for sale and address to the ship's Captain

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/69384098

Bride departed for Madras on 14 Feb 1867

The Bride, 646 tons, Grigg, master, for Madras. Passengers— Mr. and Mrs Duval, 6 children and servant, in cabin; Mary Smith, and Indian Ayah in steerage.

EXPORTS.
Per The Bride - 49 horses, 26 tons flour, 7 do. wheat, 20 do. sandalwood, 1 hhd. specimens Natural History.


https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/69385196

I don't know if it was the same through voyage, possibly not, but the Bride was in Deal from Madras on 9 Oct 1867.  You would need to search the shipping columns for movements prior to October.  I can only see badly OCRd snippets on FindMyPast so it is a bit hard to follow.

https://www.rmg.co.uk/discover/behind-the-scenes/blog/dreadnought-seamens-hospital-registers-1826-1930

Debra  :)


Offline keith110639

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Re: Women emigrants last ship.
« Reply #8 on: Sunday 31 May 20 19:29 BST (UK) »
Thanks Dundee, that gives me more information for my family records. I know more about his brother who was at sea with my great grandfather his cousin.