Author Topic: Thomas Lovatt and the English Civil War  (Read 845 times)

Offline M_ONeill

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Re: Thomas Lovatt and the English Civil War
« Reply #18 on: Tuesday 05 October 21 08:28 BST (UK) »
Ah, I hadn't yet narrowed down Elizabeth's marriage, but I agree - William Bishton seems to be the most likely candidate.

In fact, Elizabeth marrying late would explain her prominence in her father's 1685 will. After his wife Thomas makes Elizabeth his primary heir; Margery then adds a codicil surrendering her claims in favour of her daughter). At that point Elizabeth would have been the only remaining unmarried daughter. Perhaps Thomas and Margery wanted to ensure she was financially secure in the event she didn't marry.

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The age is slightly off, but I think the Jeremiah Lovatt who marries Ann Whiston is probably the son (bap. 1698) of Jeremiah and Katherine Grateley. He's the only Jeremiah of the right age/location in the area that fits the marriage.

This marriage may introduce a slight complication into the tree - namely with the parentage of Thomas Lovatt (b. & d.1733). The parish records of Church Eaton list Jeremiah and Anne as his parents - but this could be either Jeremiah and Anne Green or Jeremiah and Anne Whistons.

The former couple is closer geographically, but also somewhat older having been married since 1719. The latter couple are a much nearer match on date, but potentially somewhat further away depending on where exactly they settled.

Interestingly, there are no local baptisms registered to parents Jeremiah and Anne after 1733 until John Lovatt in 1813, in Lapley - obviously too late to belong to either of our above listed couples.

There is obviously the possibility that Jeremiah and Anne Green remained childless, but it makes me wonder what happened to Jeremiah and Anne Whistons. Did they move elsewhere? Did she die young?

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We know that branches of the family were being established in and around Shifnal by the early 18th century. There's Elizabeth's marriage to William Bishton for one, but two of her nephews by her brother John and his wife Mary Blakemore also appear to have settled there: John and Joseph.

John Lovatt through an unknown partner fathered a Mary Lovatt. I believe she later married a Robert Brookes/Brooker by license in Shifnal, she is mentioned under her married name in her uncle Jeremiah Lovatt's 1768 will.

Jeremiah married a Mary (maiden name unknown) and appeared to be plying his trade as a Tanner, based on his children's baptismal records.

Strangely, I've yet to find a marriage record for either John or Jeremiah. Based on their baptismal dates and the children we know of, I'd expect them to have married in the 1720s-1730s.

Offline lzzl25

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Re: Thomas Lovatt and the English Civil War
« Reply #19 on: Friday 08 October 21 18:20 BST (UK) »
Looking further into the archive records about William Bishton I can see mention of Killsall White House Estate, located in the parish of Tong, Shropshire. Now interestingly Draper Lovatt married Mary Marrion and the Marrion family are established in Tong by 1660s which is possibly another clue linking Draper to the Lapley/ Wheaton Aston Lovatts. I need to do some more digging.
Lizzie

Offline M_ONeill

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Re: Thomas Lovatt and the English Civil War
« Reply #20 on: Wednesday 13 October 21 15:33 BST (UK) »
The family as a whole definitely has links in the Tong/Shifnal area.

By the time of Jeremiah's will in 1768 my branch of the family had stopped being Lovatts and become Masefields; Jeremiah's elder sister Elizabeth married a Richard Masefield in Lapley in 1706. Their marriage license lists him as being of Marston, which is just outside Wheaton Aston.

The 'Richard Masefield of Weston' mentioned in Jeremiah's will may be this brother-in-law or it may be his nephew by Richard and Elizabeth. Either way, there seems to be a clear drift in this part of the family, starting from Weston, where Richard the Elder initially lived, moving down through Blymhill and Weston which are obviously both very close to Tong.


Offline lzzl25

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Re: Thomas Lovatt and the English Civil War
« Reply #21 on: Friday 15 October 21 22:23 BST (UK) »
I got a chance to visit my local library today and access the Find My Past website. I looked at Jeremiah Lovatts will, you are correct, it's a large one!.
I also discovered one for Richard Lovatt dated 1631 which mentions Maria, Thomas, Ann and John although I couldn't make out the name of his wife Rose in it.
I then came across a will of Thomas Lovatt dated 1798 which I thought could have been the year my potential Thomas, born 1711 had died, ( based on the fact that the other likely record of his  death 1777 denotes senex but he would not be that old). However this will makes no mention of any family but to a John Perry(?) labourer of Wheaton Aston and his wife Elizabeth and a Margaret wife of John Downes.
Lastly I found the will of Joseph Lovatt dated 1687,this mentions Jeremiah and Elizabeth and widow Maria or Mary, this presumably being Joseph born 1653,son of Thomas and Margery

Offline M_ONeill

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Re: Thomas Lovatt and the English Civil War
« Reply #22 on: Saturday 16 October 21 15:28 BST (UK) »
I haven't got 100% confirmation on this yet (so just strong supposition at this point), but I think the John who inherited from Thomas in 1798 may have been the husband of Elizabeth Taylor (not that one!) and thus related to the Lovatt/Masefield family branch by marriage.

To fill in the blanks: Jeremiah's eldest sister Elizabeth married Richard Masefield in 1719. Their eldest daughter Elizabeth married a Francis Taylor of Lapley in 1737. Their eldest daughter Elizabeth (bap. 1739) is I believe the likeliest candidate to be the Elizabeth Taylor who married John Perry in 1777. I believe this would make her Jeremiah's grand-niece.

Now obviously no direct relationship is listed between John and Elizabeth Perry in Thomas' 1798 will, which makes me think he may have been a more distant relative in the tree (possibly another branch of the family?).

Offline lzzl25

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Re: Thomas Lovatt and the English Civil War
« Reply #23 on: Wednesday 20 October 21 21:14 BST (UK) »
If your hypothesis is correct then it seems most likely the Thomas who left a bequest to the Perry's, who I think were living with him, possibly in a carer capacity may have had no family and, due to the connection with Jeremiah of the 1768 will, he is probably the son of Thomas Jeremiah's brother and wife Ann ie Thomas born 1724. This seems more probable than him being the father of Draper.

I think I need to further investigate the will of Joseph dated 1687 for any clues as he could potentially be the grandfather of my Thomas of 1711.

Can I ask, as you seem to have a lot of experience in genealogy,  if you think I am likely to find more wills etc other than those on Find My Past if I visit the records office?

Many thanks
Lizzie