Author Topic: Odd spelling  (Read 566 times)

Offline Gordon163

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Odd spelling
« on: Wednesday 08 July 20 15:04 BST (UK) »
Hi,

I have seen several entries in Old Cornish registers with the forename 'Jone'.

Does anyone know if this is 'John' or 'Joan' please?

Thanks,

Gordon

Offline osprey

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Re: Odd spelling
« Reply #1 on: Wednesday 08 July 20 15:09 BST (UK) »
normally Joan, might be Jane. Spelling was less regular. You may come across the a surname spelt in different ways by the same person within the same record. There's little point in worrying about what we now think of as the 'correct' spelling.

 ;)
Cornwall: Allen, Bevan, Bosisto, Carnpezzack, Donithorn, Huddy, James, Retallack, Russell, Vincent, Yeoman
Cards: Thomas (Llanbadarn Fawr)
Glam: Bowler, Cram, Galloway, James, Thomas, Watkins
Lincs: Coupland, Cram
Mon: Cram, Gwyn, John, Philpot, Smart, Watkins
Pembs: Edwards (St. Dogmael's)
Yorks: Airey, Bowler, Elliott, Hare, Hewitt, Kellett, Kemp, Stephenson, Tebb

Offline Gordon163

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Re: Odd spelling
« Reply #2 on: Wednesday 08 July 20 15:17 BST (UK) »
I have Scots relatives, too, and Joan and Jane are often interchangeable there.

Thanks,

Gordon   

Online KGarrad

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Re: Odd spelling
« Reply #3 on: Wednesday 08 July 20 15:39 BST (UK) »
One of the most popular feminine names in the Isle of Man was "Joney".

Extract from W.W.Gill A Third Manx Scrapbook dating from 1928 but not published until much later.

Joney, f.; rarely Juney; once as Johna (see above). Talbot's Manorial Roll contains no Joney, pace P. M. C. Kermode (Kirk Michael, page 30), who says it is often met with in the Roll. Formerly the commonest of Mx fem. names, but now demoded.

(as mentioned in ManxNoteBook, Frances Coakley)

Garrad (Suffolk, Essex, Somerset), Crocker (Somerset), Vanstone (Devon, Jersey), Sims (Wiltshire), Bridger (Kent)


Offline Gordon163

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Re: Odd spelling
« Reply #4 on: Wednesday 08 July 20 15:45 BST (UK) »
Thanks.

I suspect that Jone = Joan as I saw a marriage between John and Jone.

Gordon

Online Kiltpin

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Re: Odd spelling
« Reply #5 on: Wednesday 08 July 20 16:16 BST (UK) »
Spelling is an Adventure, not a Science! 

Regards 

Chas
Whannell - Eaton - Jackson
India - Scotland - Australia

Offline ThrelfallYorky

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Re: Odd spelling
« Reply #6 on: Wednesday 08 July 20 16:24 BST (UK) »
A "Jane" of mine became "Jean", another one Jeanne, another Joanna!
Threlfall (Southport), Isherwood (lancs & Canada), Newbould + Topliss(Derby), Keating & Cummins (Ireland + lancs), Fisher, Strong& Casson (all Cumberland) & Downie & Bowie, Linlithgow area Scotland . Also interested in Leigh& Burrows,(Lancashire) Griffiths (Shropshire & lancs), Leaver (Lancs/Yorks) & Anderson(Cumberland and very elusive)

Offline Andrew Tarr

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Re: Odd spelling
« Reply #7 on: Thursday 09 July 20 10:03 BST (UK) »
Spelling was less regular. You may come across the a surname spelt in different ways by the same person within the same record. 
In the 18th-C only the 'educated' could read and write, and any records you can look at now were written by clerics or lawyers.  Those people helped to regularise spellings, and if they heard a new name they wrote it by analogy with like-sounding familiar words.  The owners of the names would probably have been unable to detect any differences.  Many forenames were biblical and had been standardised by the printed word.

Education advanced during the 19th-C and the owners of surnames (especially) gradually became attached to whatever variant they had been given.
Tarr, Tydeman, Liversidge, Bartlett, Young

Offline susieroe

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Re: Odd spelling
« Reply #8 on: Thursday 09 July 20 10:28 BST (UK) »
Thanks.

I suspect that Jone = Joan as I saw a marriage between John and Jone.

Gordon

That reminds me of an incident years ago. I'd noticed lots of 'John and Jane Keat' entries for a village in Cornwall in an index in Leicester library.
Later, on holiday in Cornwall, we were visiting a little village and naturally I had to look round the graveyard. There was a headstone, at which I exclaimed "Oh, it's John and Jane!". A voice behind us said " Ah, you knew the family?"...it was the Vicar (looking pleased to meet a descendant of his late worshippers). Awkward, trying to explain what we were doing in a random churchyard, getting over-excited by random names of people who were nothing to do with my family.  :-[
Pawley, Bruin, Gillam, Hurd/Heard Timson, Keats (Kates)
https://ourkeatsfamilystory.blogspot.com/