Author Topic: Apparently invented fathers on marriage certificates?  (Read 1937 times)

guest189040

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Re: Apparently invented fathers on marriage certificates?
« Reply #9 on: Monday 13 July 20 12:27 BST (UK) »
One of my own Great Grandmothers was illegitimate and her Grandfather was listed as her Father on her Marriage Certificate.

I also have another relative who was married using his Brothers name.

Offline Ranolki

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Re: Apparently invented fathers on marriage certificates?
« Reply #10 on: Monday 13 July 20 12:51 BST (UK) »
Thank you for the ideas, I think I've found confirmation of this for one of them. 

A lady named Caroline Field gives her father's name as Henry Field.  Her mother was Maria Field, who, on the face of it was also illegitimate, her mother being Catherine Field.  However, using DNA matches I discovered that Maria's father was in fact Henry Mountford.  He later married Catherine and it appears Maria was illegitimate because Henry was only THIRTEEN at the time she was born.  Family skeletons are definitely rattling in cupboards there!

The other one isn't showing any useful information yet but the mother had five illegitimate children so I'm assuming the father may well have been around (perhaps legally married to someone else?) and his first name is as stated.  I'll check out neighbours!

All this comes about due to DNA checks.  By a convoluted system I have matched up almost all of my larger DNA matches to family lines.  I have discovered my grandfather was definitely not who we had been led to believe (and I also believe neither my father nor his sibling had any clue their father wasn't who they believed).  But I still have quite a few medium sized DNA matches who are very often connected to each other but who I cannot tie down anywhere.  I'm assuming they "belong" to one or other of these two invented fathers.  I suppose I have to be patient and wait for a bigger link and hope they have definite info on their ancestry to see if it can be fitted together.  Meantime I don't think looking much further will help me.  Unless anyone can think of more options?

Offline louisa maud

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Re: Apparently invented fathers on marriage certificates?
« Reply #11 on: Monday 13 July 20 12:57 BST (UK) »
In 2 instances that I know the grandparents brought the child up, in each case the child thought their grandfather was in fact their father, reasonable mistake I think

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Online HughC

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Re: Apparently invented fathers on marriage certificates?
« Reply #12 on: Monday 13 July 20 13:20 BST (UK) »
I think an incorrect father's name can come about without any illegitimacy.

I found an entry in a church register where the bride's father was named as Frederick when in fact he appears to have been Alfred.  I imagine she gave his name as Fred; the clergyman decided that that is not a proper name and 'corrected' it.  Another possibility is that he was no longer alive and she was given in marriage by her brother whose name was then entered in the space for the father.
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Offline coombs

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Re: Apparently invented fathers on marriage certificates?
« Reply #13 on: Monday 13 July 20 13:34 BST (UK) »
Quite common for illegitimate children to do that. My crafty ancestor in London had a number of illegitimate children and she made things up on the birth certs and even gave her mother's maiden name as her maiden name. And on the children's marriage certs, they invented a father.

On occasions they even put their adoptive father/stepfather down as their father on their marriage certs, as they saw them like a real father. Bless em.

Researching:

LONDON, Coombs, Roberts, Auber, Helsdon, Fradine, Morin, Goodacre
DORSET Coombs, Munday
NORFOLK Helsdon, Riches, Harbord, Budery
KENT Roberts, Goodacre
SUSSEX Walder, Boniface, Dinnage, Standen, Lee, Botten, Wickham, Jupp
SUFFOLK Titshall, Frost, Fairweather, Mayhew, Archer, Eade, Scarfe
DURHAM Stewart, Musgrave, Wilson, Forster
SCOTLAND Stewart in Selkirk
USA Musgrave, Saix
ESSEX Cornwell, Stock, Quilter, Lawrence, Whale, Clift
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Offline AntonyMMM

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Re: Apparently invented fathers on marriage certificates?
« Reply #14 on: Monday 13 July 20 14:06 BST (UK) »
There is no requirement for the father named on a marriage register to be the biological father.

An adoptive father, or a step-father,  is specifically allowed although when GRO issued that guidance I don't know.

A step father has to be married to the person's mother (not just be a live-in partner) and should be identified as "step-father" on the register.

For adoptive fathers there is nothing added to show that is the case.

As a registrar you do notice that sometimes people can be quite vague about their father's name and occupation - especially where he has died, or left the family, when they were quite young. In my experience it was quite common for a bride or groom to have to go off and ask mum or another relative what dad's full name or his job was. And also a few chose to deliberately leave the father's name blank, although they knew exactly who he was.

Whatever they do give as their father's details are not checked or verified in any way, and as there is no requirement to produce a birth certificate when giving notice to marry, there is no simple way of checking anyway.

Offline Ranolki

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Re: Apparently invented fathers on marriage certificates?
« Reply #15 on: Monday 13 July 20 14:24 BST (UK) »
And it may be a total coincidence but according to the 1871 census, the next door neighbour is Benjamin Byng - right age too apparently...  Doing a quick check, I think there were only three Benjamins in the whole town at that point, and the other two were elderly men.  Might be worth a little checking...

Offline melba_schmelba

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Re: Apparently invented fathers on marriage certificates?
« Reply #16 on: Monday 13 July 20 14:27 BST (UK) »
Yes quite a common invention.

My biggest success was finding a father for an illegitimate child from the father's name he put on his marriage certificate.  He changed the surname to match his own but his first name and occupation led me to someone he was lodging with on a census and fitted the bill. 

So sometimes they really do mean something.
Yes I have similar. First names and occupation were the real father, last name invented. In other cases I've seen the wife's former (deceased) husband listed as the father.

Offline Sloe Gin

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Re: Apparently invented fathers on marriage certificates?
« Reply #17 on: Tuesday 14 July 20 14:25 BST (UK) »
Another scenario - which can be widely applied, not only to registrations - is where the person misunderstood what they were being asked for.
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