Author Topic: Latin translation query  (Read 128 times)

Offline Janet Waterhouse

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Latin translation query
« on: Wednesday 22 July 20 16:11 BST (UK) »
Hi,

I've been advised that the Latin phrase:

'Per expletis publictionibus'

translates as 'Marriage or Married by Banns'.

Could you confirm that's correct, or give the correct Latin phrase for 'Marriage or Married by Banns'.

Thank you.

Janet



Offline Bookbox

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Re: Latin translation query
« Reply #1 on: Wednesday 22 July 20 16:22 BST (UK) »
The phrase expletis publicationibus (note spelling) indicates that a full set of banns had been read. The literal translation is ‘publications having been completed’. (The word per wouldn't normally appear.)

Offline Janet Waterhouse

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Re: Latin translation query
« Reply #2 on: Wednesday 22 July 20 16:43 BST (UK) »

Thank you Bookbox,

this phrase comes from a Latin/English glossary aid of 31 phrases. 

Three other phrases I'd like to query, if it's okay with you?

Diri cadaveris fabricantam = 'Dead body'

Desanguine necessitudo = 'Of a blood relationship'

Cognato suo = 'Father-in-law'  In the past I've used Socer for Father-in-law.

Janet


Offline Bookbox

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Re: Latin translation query
« Reply #3 on: Wednesday 22 July 20 17:46 BST (UK) »
These phrases make little sense when they have been extracted in this way. With Latin, you need to consider the whole context to determine the meaning of any one part of it.

For example, cognatus normally means 'kinsman' (not specifically 'father-in-law'), so cognato suo means 'to, for, by, with or from his, her or their kinsman' -- and it isn’t clear which unless you can see the whole sentence.

It also helps to know whether you're dealing with classical Latin, medieval Latin or Catholic-church Latin, as the grammar used in each (and therefore the meaning) may be different.

Offline Janet Waterhouse

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Re: Latin translation query
« Reply #4 on: Wednesday 22 July 20 17:59 BST (UK) »
Thanks again.

As I said it's just a list of words and phrases.  I've no idea who, when or from which period the list of phrases came from.

Can you suggest Latin translations, which might help, for:

Dead body;

Of a blood relationship;

Father-in-law.

Any help will be appreciated.

Janet

Offline Bookbox

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Re: Latin translation query
« Reply #5 on: Wednesday 22 July 20 18:16 BST (UK) »
Suggestions ...

Dead body - cadaver
Of a blood relationship - consanguineus
Father-in-law - socer

Again, when translating from English into Latin you might choose different words from these, according to the context.


Offline Janet Waterhouse

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Re: Latin translation query
« Reply #6 on: Wednesday 22 July 20 19:36 BST (UK) »
Thank you Bookbox.

Your assistance, and comments are appreciated.

Regards,

Janet