Author Topic: Hospitality sector cleaning policies  (Read 528 times)

Offline Flemming

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Hospitality sector cleaning policies
« on: Wednesday 22 July 20 22:07 BST (UK) »
Is it me or are the strict covid cleaning measures being implemented by some hotels and catering places more about basic hygiene?

Some examples:

Kettles, remotes, light switches, door handles will be wiped between guests.

Tea cups and glassware in the rooms will be washed between guests [I presume this means pre-covid they were simply rinsed in the bathroom sink].

Complimentary toiletries will be replaced for new guests.

Room keys will be sanitised frequently.




Offline Greensleeves

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Re: Hospitality sector cleaning policies
« Reply #1 on: Wednesday 22 July 20 22:23 BST (UK) »
I live in Mid Wales and I have a friend who has a self-contained annex she rents out as holiday accommodation.  She was telling me that everything in a property has to be deep-cleaned between guests and three days should be left between one set of guests leaving and a new set arriving.  Maybe the rules in Wales are more strict, I don't know.  But certainly the rules here seem really strict.  Even in gift shops, for example, the rule is that if you touch something, then you have to buy it.  Would probably be a good idea to extend this to supermarkets: a friend when to one the other day and a man stood prodding every single packet of meat, taking them off the shelves, handling them, and then shoving them back.  Very worrying.
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Offline Roobarb

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Re: Hospitality sector cleaning policies
« Reply #2 on: Wednesday 22 July 20 23:04 BST (UK) »
It's stories like that that convince me I'm right to carry on wiping my groceries.

As for the hotels, unfortunately there's no way to be sure that they're actually carrying out the necessary procedures. Just a question of whether you trust them I suppose.

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Online Caw1

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Re: Hospitality sector cleaning policies
« Reply #3 on: Wednesday 22 July 20 23:29 BST (UK) »
I agree, it is slightly worrying that people don't get the idea to look with your eyes to select and pick up just the once!
I watched a chap in Lidls handle at least half a dozen melons including puttin some in his trolley then taking them out to replace them with two more... they all looked the same to me! He was totally oblivious that I was standing waiting distanced from him... I wanted a melon too but decided after he'd handled most of them I'd give it a miss...

You're right about how do we know hotels etc have actually cleaned.... and what did they do before! I know when we stayed out in Kenya (when visiting friends ) in the Aberdare Country Club our friend said don't drink the water that's in the thermos on the table because the staff open it look inside and if it's full they just put the lid back on... granted we're talking Africa here and over 20 years ago....

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Re: Hospitality sector cleaning policies
« Reply #4 on: Thursday 23 July 20 19:28 BST (UK) »

Kettles, remotes, light switches, door handles will be wiped between guests.

A germ expert who tested hotel-rooms found most bacteria on kettles, switches on items on bedside cabinet and inside drawers. He's also tested planes - worst areas were toilets and overhead locker-doors. This was an interview I heard weeks ago.
When shopping now I decide if I want an item before picking it up. Only reason for rejection is if a food item was almost at "use-by" date and would be wasted. 
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Offline Flemming

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Re: Hospitality sector cleaning policies
« Reply #5 on: Thursday 23 July 20 19:56 BST (UK) »
Aye, I remember watching something in a hospital waiting room that said the dirtiest place in a house is the kitchen sink because of all the things that get washed in it, particularly vegetables.

Another expert I know says TV remotes, particularly in hotels, are worse than toilets which, at least, usually get bleached and flushed regularly, although plane loos can be disgusting, especially at the end of a long haul trip. And I won't share a train loo story here for fear of the post being removed.

It all makes me wonder if the uplift in hygiene standards across the board might mitigate other nasties as well as covid. I don't suppose everyone will comply but perhaps it only takes a certain proportion of people to make the difference.

Still doesn't make me feel any more comfortable about booking a hotel room. They can deep clean the room until it sparkles but, if the cleaner doesn't wear a mask and then coughs or sneezes, it all might be for nought.  :-\

Offline LizzieL

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Re: Hospitality sector cleaning policies
« Reply #6 on: Friday 24 July 20 14:48 BST (UK) »

Kettles, remotes, light switches, door handles will be wiped between guests.

Tea cups and glassware in the rooms will be washed between guests [I presume this means pre-covid they were simply rinsed in the bathroom sink].

Complimentary toiletries will be replaced for new guests.


I agree, I would have expected this to have been standard before Covid
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Offline JenB

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Re: Hospitality sector cleaning policies
« Reply #7 on: Friday 24 July 20 14:50 BST (UK) »
But certainly the rules here seem really strict.  Even in gift shops, for example, the rule is that if you touch something, then you have to buy it. 

I'm interested to understand how that is enforced?
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Offline Pheno

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Re: Hospitality sector cleaning policies
« Reply #8 on: Friday 24 July 20 14:53 BST (UK) »
I live in Mid Wales and I have a friend who has a self-contained annex she rents out as holiday accommodation.  She was telling me that everything in a property has to be deep-cleaned between guests and three days should be left between one set of guests leaving and a new set arriving.  Maybe the rules in Wales are more strict, I don't know.  But certainly the rules here seem really strict.  Even in gift shops, for example, the rule is that if you touch something, then you have to buy it.  Would probably be a good idea to extend this to supermarkets: a friend when to one the other day and a man stood prodding every single packet of meat, taking them off the shelves, handling them, and then shoving them back.  Very worrying.

Am due to stay in a Welsh hotel for a weekend in September.  Are these the guidelines that all Welsh hotels are having to follow currently, couldn't find anything on any website, as presumably this will mean that some guests will have to be cancelled.

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