Author Topic: Will of Thomas Smith of Wanborough, Wilts. 1689  (Read 458 times)

Offline toby webb

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Will of Thomas Smith of Wanborough, Wilts. 1689
« on: Thursday 23 July 20 16:41 BST (UK) »
It's a while since i had a go at a will, so being rusty, I would be delighted with some help.
Firstl the few words on line 6 following Jesus Christ.
Thanks, Toby.

Online JenB

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Re: Will of Thomas Smith of Wanborough, Wilts. 1689
« Reply #1 on: Thursday 23 July 20 16:44 BST (UK) »
.....to have full pardon......
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Offline toby webb

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Re: Will of Thomas Smith of Wanborough, Wilts. 1689
« Reply #2 on: Thursday 23 July 20 16:53 BST (UK) »
So easy after the event. Thanks.
Line 23 involves a man's name. I know how it has been transcribed but that doesn't
seem correct. I don't want to prejudice any opinions but will reveal all later.
Thanks, T.


Offline horselydown86

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Re: Will of Thomas Smith of Wanborough, Wilts. 1689
« Reply #3 on: Thursday 23 July 20 17:49 BST (UK) »
I know how it has been transcribed but that doesn't
seem correct. I don't want to prejudice any opinions but will reveal all later.

In this case it would be useful to know.  The reason is that there is a contraction mark across the d.  Some contraction marks tell the reader what letters have been omitted, but this one doesn't.

I would say that the letters written are L-o-u/n/v-d-a-s, but that is only part of the story.  The contraction might be trivial - eg double-d - or it could be major.

Another matter - I believe the capital is an L.

I can see in the first clip the words: ...ever Lasting Life...

Do these capital Ls fully match the capital in this word?

Offline toby webb

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Re: Will of Thomas Smith of Wanborough, Wilts. 1689
« Reply #4 on: Thursday 23 July 20 18:37 BST (UK) »
 Thanks for the response.
I first came across this will in Wiltshire Notes & Queries Vol II June 1896 p82
  "    .... and to son in law Thomas Lovday's two daughters ......"
The spelling throughout the will is imaginitive  eg 'to' instead of 'two'.
However I found it difficult to read Lovday but will be interested in what you experts
have to say.
Many thanks. Toby.

Offline toby webb

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Re: Will of Thomas Smith of Wanborough, Wilts. 1689
« Reply #5 on: Thursday 23 July 20 18:40 BST (UK) »
Sorry. I missed the last question. I am quite happy with     ' L'
T

Offline horselydown86

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Re: Will of Thomas Smith of Wanborough, Wilts. 1689
« Reply #6 on: Thursday 23 July 20 18:55 BST (UK) »
I first came across this will in Wiltshire Notes & Queries Vol II June 1896 p82
  "    .... and to son in law Thomas Lovday's two daughters ......"

Thanks Toby.

This is where it becomes tricky - we have a surname with an unspecified contraction.

There is a y in the words ...when thay shall atain... so it definitely doesn't end in y.

Nevertheless, it is quite plausible - taking into account the contraction gives us Lov(e)das meaning Lovedays (or even Lov(e)da(y)s, but I think that less likely).

The next thing for you to do is check whether the name is repeated anywhere in the probate, or is to be found among the witnesses or appraisers (if there's an inventory).

If it isn't, the best way to proceed is to direct your research as if it were Loveday.  Look for wills or legal disputes in the area involving that name.  You might find a reference which will confirm the connection.

ADDED:

Or a marriage record, of course.

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Re: Will of Thomas Smith of Wanborough, Wilts. 1689
« Reply #7 on: Thursday 23 July 20 21:15 BST (UK) »
Thanks  horselydown86. I have taken the liberty of re arranging the page to give me the attached.
I would be pleased if you are able to confirm Mary & Alice as the daughter's names for

Mary Loveday baptised at Wanborough 30 April 1680 d/o Thomas
Allice Loveday baptised at Little Hinton 11 June 1685 d/o Thomas & Ann

That would fit but I like to be more certain than that. I have seen so many family trees that are absolutely ridiculous.
Would be pleased for any further comments. T.


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Re: Will of Thomas Smith of Wanborough, Wilts. 1689
« Reply #8 on: Thursday 23 July 20 21:31 BST (UK) »
It reads ... to dafters marey and alce ...

So Mary and Allice would seem to be correct equivalents.