Author Topic: Royalty in Trouble  (Read 769 times)

Offline Mckha489

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Re: Royalty in Trouble
« Reply #9 on: Saturday 01 August 20 10:21 BST (UK) »
I have, it is correctly transcribed.
currently concentrating on a number of Staffordshire families.

Offline Tom Fitton

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Re: Royalty in Trouble
« Reply #10 on: Saturday 01 August 20 10:32 BST (UK) »
Scungchie. Sounds like an anglicised word


I’d really like to find out where this Scungchie word comes from or what it refers to.
Have you seen the actual text of the newspaper or just a transcription? Often words get mangled in the process.

I’ve seen it, yes, I was the one who transcribed it.

Offline Mike in Cumbria

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Re: Royalty in Trouble
« Reply #11 on: Saturday 01 August 20 10:39 BST (UK) »
I may be wrong, but to me, the article sounds tongue in cheek.  I can't find any instance of the term, but "the well-known Fort scungchie" sounds as if it might be describing someone who is a habitual drunkard or has mental health problems, in which case it's possible the claimed link to royalty may have been only in Albert's imagination.

It makes a lot of sense if you read it as a tongue in cheek report.
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Offline Tom Fitton

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Re: Royalty in Trouble
« Reply #12 on: Saturday 01 August 20 10:40 BST (UK) »
I may be wrong, but to me, the article sounds tongue in cheek.  I can't find any instance of the term, but "the well-known Fort scungchie" sounds as if it might be describing someone who is a habitual drunkard or has mental health problems, in which case it's possible the claimed link to royalty may have been only in Albert's imagination.

It makes a lot of sense if you read it as a tongue in cheek report.

Yeah, just a shame that they couldn’t be bothered to report it more accurately for people like me to review 157 years later.

Offline Isabel H

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Re: Royalty in Trouble
« Reply #13 on: Saturday 01 August 20 12:03 BST (UK) »
I'm sorry my take on it has dampened your excitement, but please don't be despondent. It's still an interesting article showing the day to day (probably very frustrating) policing matters that Butters had to deal with as well as the more glamorous aspects of his career, and it all adds to the overall picture.

I wonder if a genuine "person of high lineage" would have needed to be escorted to the bank to open an account, or have needed the constable to take care of the bank book for him?  I suspect Albert was a local character, and the judge was playing along with his delusions of grandeur.  The report may have been intended to amuse readers with an account of someone well-known to them.

 
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Offline Redroger

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Re: Royalty in Trouble
« Reply #14 on: Saturday 01 August 20 13:53 BST (UK) »
I may be wrong, but to me, the article sounds tongue in cheek.  I can't find any instance of the term, but "the well-known Fort scungchie" sounds as if it might be describing someone who is a habitual drunkard or has mental health problems, in which case it's possible the claimed link to royalty may have been only in Albert's imagination.
I had not heard the term before, but could it be an Indian corruption of the term scrounger?
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Offline bbart

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Re: Royalty in Trouble
« Reply #15 on: Sunday 02 August 20 08:03 BST (UK) »
Perhaps this is the same Albert?

Snippet from the Bombay Gazette 25 March 1865 about a large gala and firework display, which left Albert unhappy.

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Offline Mike in Cumbria

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Re: Royalty in Trouble
« Reply #16 on: Sunday 02 August 20 09:57 BST (UK) »
Perhaps this is the same Albert?

Snippet from the Bombay Gazette 25 March 1865 about a large gala and firework display, which left Albert unhappy.

"The well-known mendicant, Albert" - it certainly sounds like the same person. Good find.

You might already know this, but Fort is a district in Bombay. So, "a well known Fort Scungchie" makes sense if a Scungchie is a beggar or a drunkard, as Albert seems to have been.
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Offline ThrelfallYorky

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Re: Royalty in Trouble
« Reply #17 on: Sunday 02 August 20 17:43 BST (UK) »
"Scuzzie"? meaning a bit disgusting, unclean, scruffy?
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