Author Topic: Baptism vs Christening  (Read 1632 times)

Offline Naizam

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Baptism vs Christening
« on: Friday 07 August 20 22:43 BST (UK) »
Good day all,

Please excuse my ignorance but I'd like some help on Christening vs Baptisms. Depending upon which website I choose to use, events are labeled as one or the other. For example:

Ancestry/Find My Past: Robert Meiklejohn was baptized on 29 May 1825
Family Search: Robert Meiklejohn was Christened on 29 May 1825

I've googled and relive i understand the difference but it seems that sites / others use the terms interchangeably?

I use the following naming convention from my media files

Surname_Forename_Middle Initials-event year-event type

and now have files that are identical but one is a baptism (BAP) and the other a christening (CHR)?
Crawford, Smith, Marr, Newton, McClement, and more :)

Online Viktoria

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Re: Baptism vs Christening
« Reply #1 on: Friday 07 August 20 23:21 BST (UK) »
They are one and the same, in essence the welcoming of a child into the family of the church.
There was a lot of superstition in days gone by that  to my certain knowledge
lingered into the 1950ís.
Often you hear the term ď  unchrisomed child ď  ie not Christened.
Would it go to heaven or stay in Limbo?
Baptism follows when John The Baptist symbolically washed away sins in the River Jordan,notably Jesus .
In the Service in the Church of England the Minister says ď I baptise theeó-.
Christening is the lay personís term often but both involve blessings, naming, renouncing sin The Church has it we are all born in sin!!!
The water is the symbolic washing away if that sin.
The naming part is really secondary.,well to the minister but not to the parents for example .
Perhaps The Baptist Church,where total immersion is practiced uses  Baptism  all the time whereas you do hear Christening  used in the C of E.
EViktoria.

sYs

Offline GR2

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Re: Baptism vs Christening
« Reply #2 on: Friday 07 August 20 23:22 BST (UK) »
Technically, baptism refers to the sprinkling of or immersion in water. In effect, in records, there is no difference between baptism and christening. Maybe Family Search prefers the word "christen" as the site is maintained by a religious organisation. In the Church of Scotland registers "baptise" is the usual word.


Online DianaCanada

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Re: Baptism vs Christening
« Reply #3 on: Saturday 08 August 20 01:44 BST (UK) »
Iíve been under the impression that baptism is a sacrament performed in some Christian churches, and that christening is part of the process of receiving a name, being part of the same ceremony, but not a sacrament, and am not sure all churches refer to baptism, marriage, etc. as sacraments.
Also always thought a baby, in danger of dying at birth, could be baptized by anyone present? In the past, the midwife, for example.
My oldest brother was born in a RC run hospital in Quebec and my mother declined nunís suggestion of baptizing him right away.  My the time my other brother and I came along, there was a new city-run hospital where baptism was not automatically done and we all subsequently made it to the font of our local Anglican Church.

Online Viktoria

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Re: Baptism vs Christening
« Reply #4 on: Saturday 08 August 20 08:30 BST (UK) »
The Roman Catholic Church believes an unChristened /Baptised child ,should it die, would not go to heaven but remain in Limbo- the borderland of Hell!
Assigned to the unbaptised,and those born before Jesus-Christ- so  unCHRISTened .Not heaven but not as bad as hell.
Out of concern for such children the R.C. Church baptises new born babies as soon as possible.
The C.of England is not so concerned about Limbo  and is better known as the welcoming into the Church.our zMinister always says to the parents at a Christening ( or baptism) ď You have named  your baby ,we welcome him/ her into the  family  of The ChurchĒ.
It is not a legal requirement , and now not so many people attend church many parents donít bother,some do because they want the child to attend a Church School, which have good reputations , and those schools do require it.
Other parents want the family get together and do believe the baby will then be part of the Church family.
Othersóó well honestly it is often just an excuse for a knees up.
We mostly never see them again but they are made most welcome at the time.
There is superstition attached ,older generation women really
believed babies did not thrive if not Christened!
My mother in law was of that opinion ,I was almost scared to say my son had gained twelve ounces in weight the first week of his life, and him not Christened until three weeks old !
How dare he!
Often Roman Catholic babies are Christened whilst still in hospital and just a day or two old.That is certainly common in Catholic European countries, it is the worry of them being in Limbo you see.in days gone by neo natal deaths were very common.
Sorry but that is a strong belief ,which I donít believe.
If there is such a place as heaven an innocent baby is the most likely one to go there but I respect the age old beliefs of others.

So I am pretty sure Baptism and Christening ,especially for lay people are interchangeable words, but you are correct in saying Baptism is a sacrament whilst Christening is not ,so the welcoming of the baby by the use of water( back to John the Baptist) -Baptism  and itís washing away of original sin ie the sins we are born with- is the sacrament and the naming during that rite is
Christening.
The child is then ď known to ChristĒ.
Most people say a baby is being Christened  very few say Baptised.
, Even Church magazines etc list Christenings ,ours is one such.
You donít get a Baptism without the naming also and not the naming without the Baptism,well not in Church.
I donít think I have made it any clearer have I!
Viktoria.
Viktoria.

Online heywood

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Re: Baptism vs Christening
« Reply #5 on: Saturday 08 August 20 09:00 BST (UK) »
Limbo is not now part of Catholic teaching, thankfully.
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Online Viktoria

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Re: Baptism vs Christening
« Reply #6 on: Saturday 08 August 20 09:15 BST (UK) »
Really, gosh I did not know that, I did know every effort was made to baptise babies in the belief that otherwise they would be there for ever , hence Baptisms in hospital ,a matter of course in Catholic countries.
It was offered to me in Belgium, two days after the birth of my daughter,she was not in any danger ,but the Maternity  Clinic  was run by Nuns .
Ah well, times change donít they ,there has been a topic about Churching women ,which is  now essentially  a thanksgiving but as even in the Baptism service it says babies are conceived and born in sin ,and there was even in 1957 when my first baby was born part of the Churching service which mentioned that ,and infuriated me!
Why only me there in that case!
Never mind .
Good luck with your research.
Viktoria.

Offline Crumblie

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Re: Baptism vs Christening
« Reply #7 on: Saturday 08 August 20 10:00 BST (UK) »

It is not a legal requirement , and now not so many people attend church many parents donít bother,some do because they want the child to attend a Church School, which have good reputations , and those schools do require it.


I went to a church school with a very good reputation and it was a requirement that I underwent confirmation first.

Online Kiltpin

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Re: Baptism vs Christening
« Reply #8 on: Saturday 08 August 20 15:28 BST (UK) »

Also always thought a baby, in danger of dying at birth, could be baptized by anyone present? In the past, the midwife, for example.

 

I cannot speak for other Denominations, but the Church of England will accept that ANY Christian may baptise another person if there is a danger or belief that the person might die without. 

Regards 

Chas
Whannell - Eaton - Jackson
India - Scotland - Australia