Author Topic: One word on a Cheshire Will of 1602.  (Read 381 times)

Offline SiGr

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Re: One word on a Cheshire Will of 1602.
« Reply #9 on: Saturday 15 August 20 11:32 BST (UK) »
Hi, horselydown86,
Thank you for your transcription - I am quite new to this and only after your work do I now see the words.
The 's' had not occurred to me - I took it as the modern 'h' of Richard without thinking. So, now that you mention it, it seems out of place, and in fact 'out of time'.
The other thing that now comes to mind is that the Will is not signed, not even Richard's mark. As Recorder of Chester he was obviously literate but I wonder if his "extreme old age" meant he was no longer capable. The date at the top is January and the date in the Memorandum below is February so there is a clear time lag.
More mysteries to consider.
Thanks again and best wishes.
Simon
(1) Janions of Cheshire, Lancashire, Hawaii, Vancouver and Seattle.
(2) Gregorys of Tarporley, Cheshire.
(3) Pughs of 'The New Pale' near Frodsham and Delamere in Cheshire.
(4) Nevills of Llanelly, Llangennech and Felinfoel.
(5) Yaldens of Ovington/Lovington in Hampshire.

Offline horselydown86

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Re: One word on a Cheshire Will of 1602.
« Reply #10 on: Saturday 15 August 20 15:57 BST (UK) »
The other thing that now comes to mind is that the Will is not signed, not even Richard's mark. As Recorder of Chester he was obviously literate but I wonder if his "extreme old age" meant he was no longer capable. The date at the top is January and the date in the Memorandum below is February so there is a clear time lag.

The presence of the Memorandum is consistent with the will not being signed.  Does the will specify that it is a nuncupative will?

Offline SiGr

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Re: One word on a Cheshire Will of 1602.
« Reply #11 on: Saturday 15 August 20 16:04 BST (UK) »
Good timing, I just logged back in.
No. There is the one page Will. Then an Inventory. The detail on FindMyPast states it was Supra and that there was no Codicil either.
(1) Janions of Cheshire, Lancashire, Hawaii, Vancouver and Seattle.
(2) Gregorys of Tarporley, Cheshire.
(3) Pughs of 'The New Pale' near Frodsham and Delamere in Cheshire.
(4) Nevills of Llanelly, Llangennech and Felinfoel.
(5) Yaldens of Ovington/Lovington in Hampshire.


Offline SiGr

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Re: One word on a Cheshire Will of 1602.
« Reply #12 on: Sunday 16 August 20 01:28 BST (UK) »
Hi, horselydown86,
I was just looking at the Will of John Birkenhead of 1620 - so, quite close to that of this thread of 1602.
I noticed the attached which seems to read 'Richard Birkenhead' and it reminded me of your comment about the apparent 's' in the middle of 'Richard'. It seems to be the 'a'
You kindly helped me with a similar Cheshire Will of 1620 for Raphe Birkenhead on 3 Aug at 04:49 BST and you and goldie61 highlighted the extended 'a' in that document. Given the names and dates, I suspect it was the same person who wrote both documents.
Regards.
Simon
(1) Janions of Cheshire, Lancashire, Hawaii, Vancouver and Seattle.
(2) Gregorys of Tarporley, Cheshire.
(3) Pughs of 'The New Pale' near Frodsham and Delamere in Cheshire.
(4) Nevills of Llanelly, Llangennech and Felinfoel.
(5) Yaldens of Ovington/Lovington in Hampshire.

Offline horselydown86

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Re: One word on a Cheshire Will of 1602.
« Reply #13 on: Sunday 16 August 20 07:24 BST (UK) »
I noticed the attached which seems to read 'Richard Birkenhead' and it reminded me of your comment about the apparent 's' in the middle of 'Richard'. It seems to be the 'a'

I can see the possibility that the slanted line of an a might contribute to the apparent s.

I suggested the letter looked like an s because it has a long component beneath the line which looks to be continuous with the portion above the line, plus a wide loop at the top extending into a downstroke.  It's identical to the s in p(re)sence.

Your latest image does present the possibility that it could be part of the bottom loop of the h plus the slant on the a making the whole.

If you look at paie in the original image, he has formed the slant on the a from a line which runs all the way up from the bottom of the p.  (This line does loop at the top, although it's a narrower loop.)

Maybe he has done something similar from the bottom of the h in Rychard.