Author Topic: Spoons in a 1633 will  (Read 203 times)

Offline mijath

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Spoons in a 1633 will
« on: Thursday 03 September 20 22:50 BST (UK) »
Hello, can anyone shed any light on what kind of spoons was my ancestor dishing out to all and sundry in his will?

Is it an archaic term or a dialect word? He was from Nottinghamshire.

Thanks
Thorpe, Feak & Townsend (Norfolk) / Ormandy & Slater (Dalton-in-Furness) / Corner (Liverpool) / Wray (Lincolnshire) / Fidler, Bridge & Turner (Derbyshire)

Offline jimnix

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Re: Spoons in a 1633 will
« Reply #1 on: Thursday 03 September 20 22:52 BST (UK) »
My first thought was “Silver” but now I’m not sure  ???

Online Jebber

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Re: Spoons in a 1633 will
« Reply #2 on: Thursday 03 September 20 23:02 BST (UK) »
It does say Silver Spoon.

It was very common for individual spoons to be bequeathed in Wills. I have several who’s original ownership I have traced back through family Wills.
CHOULES All ,  COKER Harwich Essex & Rochester Kent 
COLE Gt. Oakley, & Lt. Oakley, Essex.
DUNCAN Kent
EVERITT Colchester,  Dovercourt & Harwich Essex
GULLIVER/GULLOFER Fifehead Magdalen Dorset
HORSCROFT Kent.
KING Sturminster Newton, Dorset. MONK Odiham Ham.
SCOTT Wrabness, Essex
WILKINS Stour Provost, Dorset.
WICKHAM All in North Essex.
WICKHAM Medway Towns, Kent from 1880
WICKHAM, Ipswich, Suffolk.


Offline horselydown86

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Re: Spoons in a 1633 will
« Reply #3 on: Friday 04 September 20 05:57 BST (UK) »
To explain, what is written is silv, with an upward curving mark ending in a wiggle coming off the v.

This mark is a standard contraction, standing in for either er or re.  (Sometimes it doesn't have the wiggle at the end.)

There's another example in Reply #14 here:

https://www.rootschat.com/forum/index.php?topic=832968.msg6977151#msg6977151

In this case it's replacing re.

Offline mijath

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Re: Spoons in a 1633 will
« Reply #4 on: Friday 04 September 20 08:46 BST (UK) »
Thank you all!

I've transcribed every part of this will apart from this word - I really couldn't see past that last letter being an N.

I've never encountered that contraction before - I've made a note.
Thorpe, Feak & Townsend (Norfolk) / Ormandy & Slater (Dalton-in-Furness) / Corner (Liverpool) / Wray (Lincolnshire) / Fidler, Bridge & Turner (Derbyshire)