Author Topic: Farming north of Preston  (Read 977 times)

Offline schimmellover

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Farming north of Preston
« on: Saturday 05 September 20 16:30 BST (UK) »
Hi,
I am writing up my family history research and would like more information about the lives lived by folks farming in the Claughton/Garstang area between Preston and Lancaster in the 1750's-1840's.  Are there any relevant published histories that anyone could recommend?

Offline Rena

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Re: Farming north of Preston
« Reply #1 on: Saturday 05 September 20 17:34 BST (UK) »
I usually start off by surfing for the GENUKI webpage of the town, village, that I need to research.

Here's a page for Garstang.  https://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/LAN/Garstang/

You'll notice there's a link to click on for "nearby places"
Aberdeen: Findlay-Shirras,McCarthy: MidLothian: Mason,Telford,Darling,Cruikshanks,Bennett,Sime, Bell: Lanarks:Crum, Brown, MacKenzie,Cameron, Glen, Millar; Ross: Urray:Mackenzie:  Moray: Findlay; Marshall/Marischell: Perthshire: Brown Ferguson: Wales: McCarthy, Thomas: England: Almond, Askin, Dodson, Well(es). Harrison, Maw, McCarthy, Munford, Pye, Shearing, Smith, Smythe, Speight, Strike, Wallis/Wallace, Ward, Wells;Germany: Flamme,Ehlers, Bielstein, Germer, Mohlm, Reupke

Offline Maiden Stone

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Re: Farming north of Preston
« Reply #2 on: Saturday 05 September 20 20:55 BST (UK) »
I've seen farming related articles + adverts in mid-19thC. local newspapers.
I have a book about Garstang which includes the period. I'll look it out and check references.
Cowban

Offline andrewalston

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Re: Farming north of Preston
« Reply #3 on: Saturday 05 September 20 21:25 BST (UK) »
The main type of farming is, and has been for at least a couple of centuries, dairy.

It is the centre of Lancashire cheese making. Milk from the cows would predominantly go into the cheese vats until the coming of the railways in the 1830s. Only a little could be used locally.

The railways meant that fresh milk could be sent to the towns. Cheese has a much longer shelf life, so could always find a market at the end of a cart ride.

Lancashire cheese is one of only two traditional British cheeses which is not pressed to extract the whey - it settles under its own weight. The other such is Stilton.
Looking at ALSTON in south Ribble area, ALSTEAD and DONBAVAND/DUNBABIN etc. everywhere, HOWCROFT and MARSH in Bolton and Westhoughton, PICKERING in the Whitehaven area.

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Offline Maiden Stone

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Re: Farming north of Preston
« Reply #4 on: Saturday 05 September 20 21:55 BST (UK) »
"The history of the parish of Garstang in the county of Lancaster" by Henry Fishwick, printed for the Chetham Society 1878-9 https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/001640499
The book about Garstang which I have isn't this one. Mine is by a modern writer. Henry Fishwick also wrote histories of other Lancashire parishes including Preston and Poulton-le-Fylde. Some are listed on the website.

There may be something on this list of out of print publications from the Record Society of Lancashire and Cheshire. rscl.org.uk/out-of-print-publications

Some background, not specific to the area:
"Causes of Discontent and Distress 1812-1822" - "Industry and agricultural problems" on "A Web of English History" www.historyhome.co.uk/c-eight/distress/distress.htm
This is later but some of the descriptions might still have applied:
"Agricultural Labourers (1874)" on The Victorian Web
www.victorianweb.org/history/work/labourers.html
As farmers are dependent on the weather this is a compilation of notable weather for the period:
"British Weather 1700-1849"
https:///www.pascalbonenfant.com/18c/geography/weather.html
There were 10 wet summers in a row in the 1750s. Weather in another run of years was affected by eruptions of several volcanoes.

I thought I'd bookmarked some items on farming in 18thC. Lancashire but all I had was a study of life leasehold in West Lancs.
Cowban

Offline schimmellover

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Re: Farming north of Preston
« Reply #5 on: Saturday 05 September 20 23:09 BST (UK) »
Many thanks for the info. Iíll have a look for the books. The cheese detail is interesting - I have a few Preston cheese sellers in the family.

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Re: Farming north of Preston
« Reply #6 on: Sunday 06 September 20 00:25 BST (UK) »
There are quite a few cheese makers in the area with Dewlay being pretty big, they are to the west of Garstang on the main A6, and Beacon Fell Cheese is probably the nearest to Claughton.

My own family were farmers and labourers in and around Cockerham which is a few miles north of Garstang and it is still all dairy farming with some sheep on the marsh areas and fells.

Offline Maiden Stone

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Re: Farming north of Preston
« Reply #7 on: Sunday 06 September 20 01:59 BST (UK) »
My own family were farmers and labourers in and around Cockerham which is a few miles north of Garstang and it is still all dairy farming with some sheep on the marsh areas and fells.

Ditto. We both have Lamb ancestors. One of mine married at Garstang.
My book is "Garstang and District: Historical selections" by John Askew, published 2012. Chapter titles include: A year in old Garstang; Market; The poor; Agricultural and Horticultural shows; Claughton. A chapter "Principal buildings" includes the corn mill, corn exchange and tithe barn. An advert for the soon to be opened Garstang Corn Market appeared in "The Lancaster Gazette" 21st July 1808. The same newspaper reported on the success of the market in September 1808. (I've eaten lunch at the tithe barn by the canal and bought cheese at the market in the old corn exchange building.)
Sources of information in the book which may be relevant are:
 various documents at Lancashire Archives;
 local newspapers, mainly "The Lancaster Gazette" and "The Preston Chronicle & Lancashire Advertiser":
"The New Lancashire Gazetteer and Topographical Dictionary" by S. Clarke (1830)
+ some books by travellers who sojourned at Garstang en route north or south -
A. Hewitson "Northward" (1900)
William Hutton "The History of the Roman Wall" (1802)
Thomas Pennant "A Tour of Scotland and a Voyage to the Hebrides" (1772)
Pennant remarked on the fine cattle and "abundance of potatoes". He said potatoes were sent to other places in England, Scotland and Ireland. (That strikes me as sending coals to Newcastle.)

Garstang Agricultural Society was formed in 1809 and held 1st show 1813. Reports in Lancaster Gazette. Mention of sheep and long-horned cattle. The neighbourhood of Garstang was well-known for this cattle breed.
Several fairs were held in Garstang in 19th century.
 Candlemas Fair (February) was hiring time for servants.
Spring Fair in April began 1830s. Reports in "Lancaster Gazette" and "Preston Chronicle".
Cattle, wool, sheep and lambs were sold at Peterstide  Fair in July. (Feast-day of St. Peter & Paul is at the end of June but the calendar change in England in mid-18thC caused the Fair to be held in July from then on.) Thomas Hutton (author of "The History of the Roman Wall", above) was in Garstang for Peterstide Fair 1801. The local country lasses made a BIG impression on him. They arrived in town in their best attire with their skirts tucked up to keep them out of the mud. He described them  as ".. large as troopers ... exhibited limbs of gigantic size, well adapted for working, running or kicking ..." (I suspect he was confusing them with horses.  ;D) He noted the men were similarly well-built. (My GGF whose ancestors were from the area was "well-built".)
Martinmas Fair in November marked the end of the farming year. This was a major fair. Sales of cattle and horses attracted buyers and dealers from all over Britain. An estimated 3000 cattle were at the fair in 1805. It was also a hiring fair for farm servants. 
 
 
Cowban

Offline schimmellover

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Re: Farming north of Preston
« Reply #8 on: Sunday 06 September 20 08:28 BST (UK) »
So much to look at. Thank you so much.
My ancestor is Thomas Seed b. 1754. He worked on the Claughton Hall estate from 1790ís to 1839. He married Anne Gardner in 1776 when he is recorded as a house carpenter from Goosnargh. Presumably he might have done an apprenticeship, but I canít find any records for this. They had 14 children baptised at St Thomas RC Claughton.
I am in touch with the descendent of the Claughton Hall family, but not finding much about the tenantry.
Iíd really like to find more about Thomas - parents etc- but nothing so far.
The family were Catholic (though not sure if Thomas became so on joining the Claughton Hall estate) which makes tracking a bit tricky!

Not sure why Iím telling you all this! I guess just inc are anyone comes across anything.
Many thanks again.
Caroline