Author Topic: Double barrelled surnames  (Read 724 times)

Offline Andrew Tarr

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Re: Double barrelled surnames
« Reply #9 on: Thursday 10 September 20 23:10 BST (UK) »
(When I was teaching, we always guessed if the children on the Admissions list with DB surnames were posh, or simply that their parents never married.)

Just as an aside, it seems that these days d-b 'surnames' are becoming commoner - in both senses of that word.  The working class has usually made-do with just a single forename, while those they 'look up to' often had two, and the upper classes may have had more.  Of course the early Victorians started a vogue for using ancestors' surnames as middle names, and perhaps a hyphen got inserted later ?
Tarr, Tydeman, Liversidge, Bartlett, Young

Offline Skoosh

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Re: Double barrelled surnames
« Reply #10 on: Friday 11 September 20 09:03 BST (UK) »
Real Scottish toffs generally did not use a hyphen, Robert Bontine Cunninghame Graham, in particular, dismissed it as a southern affectation!  ;D

Skoosh.

Offline Zaphod99

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Re: Double barrelled surnames
« Reply #11 on: Friday 11 September 20 10:08 BST (UK) »
This made me smile. My very nice neighbour with a d-b name, Eton educated, would be surprised if I told him that just 3 generations back his Guards Regiment ancestor just added his mother's maiden name to his surname. Shoild I tell him?

Zaph


Offline JohninSussex

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Re: Double barrelled surnames
« Reply #12 on: Friday 11 September 20 15:52 BST (UK) »
Real Scottish toffs generally did not use a hyphen, Robert Bontine Cunninghame Graham, in particular, dismissed it as a southern affectation!  ;D

Skoosh.

That distinction never occurred to me, thank you.
The Twisleton-Wykeham-Fiennes family use a hyphen (well more than one obviously) ;
as do the Plunkett-Ernle-Erle-Drax.  But the Montagu Douglas Scott family don't.
The Rees-Mogg hypertoffs father son and daughter are hyphenated but Iain Duncan Smith isn't.

So I think that demonstrates the theory quite well: no hyphens are worn with the kilt.  Probably isn't universal though.
Rutter, Sampson, Swinerd, Head, Redman in Kent.  Others in Cheshire, Manchester, Glos/War/Worcs.
RUTTER family and Matilda Sampson's Will:

Offline Zaphod99

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Re: Double barrelled surnames
« Reply #13 on: Tuesday 10 November 20 11:55 GMT (UK) »
Just recently I read about a couple with the surnames Christmas and White getting married and using the double barreled name White-Christmas. It's a true story, it was widely reported a couple of weeks ago.

Zaph

Offline brigidmac

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Re: Double barrelled surnames
« Reply #14 on: Tuesday 10 November 20 13:28 GMT (UK) »
Stan
Personally  I found the fbmd link you gave really hard to make head or tail of
Is the answer to use square brackets instead of hyphens for double barrellec naes ?

Tree
Putting one of the names in first name section would work particularly well for scottish heritage where the first name tradition s
Often include grandparents surname

Roberts,Fellman.Macdermid smith jones,Bloch,Irvine,Hallis Stevenson