Author Topic: Senior, Junior, The Elder & The Younger  (Read 746 times)

Offline Girl Guide

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Re: Senior, Junior, The Elder & The Younger
« Reply #9 on: Monday 21 September 20 18:38 BST (UK) »
I thought Ms was a relatively new thing. 

"Ms. did not become generally accepted as a title until well into the 1980s, after years of lobbying for its use by feminist activists."

I get annoyed when I see it as it is a short form of manuscript!

I think if you go back far enough Mistress was used whether you were married or single.  ::)

Ashford: Somerset, London
England: Devon, London, New Zealand
Holdway: Wiltshire
Hooper: Bristol, Somerset
Knowling: Devon, London
Southcott: Devon, China
Strong: Wiltshire
Watson: Cambridgeshire
White: Bristol
Windo - Gloucestershire, Somerset, Wiltshire

Offline steadyrollingman

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Re: Senior, Junior, The Elder & The Younger
« Reply #10 on: Monday 21 September 20 19:39 BST (UK) »
Just an observation .... "senior" and "junior" seem to be terms used more recently, and "the elder" and "the younger" used more in the dim and distant past.  :)

I can't comment on that (although I obviously am) but certainly when there were 4 people sharing the same name they had little choice but to use all four variants. My guys are mid-1700s and there were certainly other families using those same variants at the same time.

Offline steadyrollingman

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Re: Senior, Junior, The Elder & The Younger
« Reply #11 on: Monday 21 September 20 19:45 BST (UK) »
I don't believe it's what they were called during the normal course of events but more
how they were referred to in official documents in order to differentiate one from
the other.

Well, you'd think so but the marriages of three of them happened within two years of each other but annoyingly there was only one of them who was referred to by his clarification in the PR. (And none of them were specified as bachelor or widower...). It was really only after the baptisms of their kids began where those variants became more frequently used - arguably less important when there's a wife's name to help clarify things...

Offline steadyrollingman

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Re: Senior, Junior, The Elder & The Younger
« Reply #12 on: Monday 21 September 20 19:48 BST (UK) »
Senior, Junior, The Elder & The Younger   ...............

Out of idle coronavirus curiosity women never had such titles. I cannot see why not!


Arguably less need for them, certainly in baptism records anyway, when there was / may have been a maiden name included?


Offline Maiden Stone

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Re: Senior, Junior, The Elder & The Younger
« Reply #13 on: Tuesday 22 September 20 01:08 BST (UK) »
Senior, Junior, The Elder & The Younger   ...............

Out of idle coronavirus curiosity women never had such titles. I cannot see why not!

However women had Miss and Mrs and Ms whereas men only had Master and Mister (Mr).
A woman was the property of her father or husband. If her husband predeceased her she was widow or "relict" of her husband.
I've seen "Mrs" before the name of a young unmarried gentlewoman in a C18th church register. 
Cowban

Online bbart

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Re: Senior, Junior, The Elder & The Younger
« Reply #14 on: Tuesday 22 September 20 20:20 BST (UK) »
On the snippet, isn't the middle one referred to as "the youngest" as opposed to "the younger"?
To me it appears these are all directly related, and the writer is just indicating which generation is which.