Author Topic: DNA shocker  (Read 1959 times)

Offline NooshieW

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,803
  • Today is the day of my life
    • View Profile
Re: DNA shocker
« Reply #27 on: Wednesday 07 October 20 23:57 BST (UK) »
It is very frustrating finding a DNA Shocker or rather an unexpected match.

I am detailing my own trials and tribulations of a 364 cM match in the thread that I started:-

https://www.rootschat.com/forum/index.php?topic=837260.0

Hours and hours have so far been spent creating my Floating Branch of the high cM match which has now been linked together to four other shared matches, so now I have five DNA Matches in their own mini tree but try as I may I cannot yet link them to my own Tree.

We are now in the midst of creating a Leeds Method analysis spreadsheet so it is very much a work in progress.
Very interesting, especially how the amount of cm can vary. One cousin ( we share the same 3 x gt grandparents) is only 15 cm / 1 segment. The same relationship on another branch, the person shares 220 cm . I canít fathom it out!! I know we inherit differing amounts of DNA from different lines,but that seems a huge difference.
Hope you sort yours out, I have a long way to go.
Devon,Cornwall and Somerset
West,Horne,Andrews,Melluish and Denniford

Offline anne_p

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,117
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: DNA shocker
« Reply #28 on: Thursday 08 October 20 00:48 BST (UK) »
I always find it odd that most folk are trying to find an identity whilst others get a shock in their results that produce an NPE. ( Not Parent Expected)

My DNA experience was a bit different.
After almost 20yrs, I consider myself fairly experienced in family history.

Stupid as this may sound, it never crossed my mind ( not once) that my late mum had a biological father.
None listed on any document. None was ever mentioned, therefore none existed.
  ( I'm experienced. LOL)


My own curiosity over unidentified matches combined with determination to find the link, I inadvertently unearthed his identity.
I certainly wasn't looking for a "non existent" grandfather but, DNA found him.

I had been looking at this person and his family on my study tree for weeks.
I then found a public tree with photos of this man on it.
 I almost fell off my chair.
The resemblance to my mum was scary and the preverbial penny?.... it finally dropped !

That was my shocker


Offline Andrew Tarr

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,472
  • Wanted: Charles Percy Liversidge
    • View Profile
Re: DNA shocker
« Reply #29 on: Thursday 08 October 20 09:56 BST (UK) »
I sometimes wonder about my mother's parents.  They married in 1897 and almost immediately sailed to India, where their only child was born 7 years later, when Granny was 34.  It seems odd that it took that long, and that there were no other children (as far as I know :o).  Might she have sown a wild oat ?

I haven't got involved with DNA analysis, and I don't think I would be unduly disturbed if it turned up something irregular.  It might add an exotic flavour to my tree ....
Tarr, Tydeman, Liversidge, Bartlett, Young


Offline chempat

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 8,000
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: DNA shocker
« Reply #30 on: Thursday 08 October 20 10:45 BST (UK) »
I know a lot of families that only had one child, in history and nowadays.  Nothing unusual.

She may have had a lot of miscarriages.

There are many reasons why no child until 7 years later.

Offline brigidmac

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 3,427
  • Computer incompetent but stiil trying
    • View Profile
Re: DNA shocker
« Reply #31 on: Thursday 08 October 20 11:05 BST (UK) »
Nooshie while there is a large range of differences in cm s
With 3rd cousins you do have to consider that you might not share BOTH. Great grandparents
I have a lot of examples and my mother and aunts DNA to compare
The smaller matches are often because ancestors had a second marriage .my great grandfather had children with first wife and married a woman who had children with her first husband so descendants of my mother's HALF cousins have smaller matches to me
Or if I child has been passed off as it's grandmother s child when actually child of her daughter .
The DNA match can be smaller than you expect .
Have you seen the cm painter chart .
Can someone share it please .I can't post attachments.
Roberts,Fellman.Macdermid MCDERMID McDiarmid Gardner Jones ,Bloch,Irvine,Hallis Stevenson ,McKay

Offline Nanna52

  • RootsChat Veteran
  • *****
  • Posts: 774
  • Edwin WB Vincent, my actor, (1881-1940)
    • View Profile
Re: DNA shocker
« Reply #32 on: Thursday 08 October 20 11:11 BST (UK) »
Do you mean this brididmac?

https://dnapainter.com/tools/sharedcmv4

James -Victoria, Australia originally from Keynsham, Somerset.
Janes - Keynsham and Bristol area.
Heale/Hale - Keynsham, Somerset
Vincent - Illogan/Redruth, Cornwall.  Moved to Sculcoates, Yorkshire; Grass Valley, California; Timaru, New Zealand and Victoria, Australia.
Williams somewhere in Wales - he kept moving
Ellis - Anglesey

Gedmatch A327531

Offline Andrew Tarr

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,472
  • Wanted: Charles Percy Liversidge
    • View Profile
Re: DNA shocker
« Reply #33 on: Thursday 08 October 20 13:01 BST (UK) »
I know a lot of families that only had one child, in history and nowadays.  Nothing unusual. She may have had a lot of miscarriages.  There are many reasons why no child until 7 years later.

Of course there are.  But in this family it would have been 'unusual' as she was one of nine and her husband one of eleven.  That in itself may have caused a 'backlash' I suppose; at that time the 'usual' thing was to have several children.
Tarr, Tydeman, Liversidge, Bartlett, Young

Offline coombs

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 6,147
  • Research the dead....forget the living.
    • View Profile
Re: DNA shocker
« Reply #34 on: Thursday 08 October 20 13:15 BST (UK) »
I am sure NPE's were rare though. Only a 2% chance of such an event in each parental event. And some DNA tests are not infallible as well, and people can be assuming it is an NPE when there could be many other reasons rather than jumping to painful conclusions.
Researching:

LONDON, Coombs, Roberts, Auber, Helsdon, Fradine, Morin, Goodacre
DORSET Coombs, Munday
NORFOLK Helsdon, Riches, Harbord, Budery
KENT Roberts, Goodacre
SUSSEX Walder, Boniface, Dinnage, Standen, Lee, Botten, Wickham, Jupp
SUFFOLK Titshall, Frost, Fairweather, Mayhew, Archer, Eade, Scarfe
DURHAM Stewart, Musgrave, Wilson, Forster
SCOTLAND Stewart in Selkirk
USA Musgrave, Saix
ESSEX Cornwell, Stock, Quilter, Lawrence, Whale, Clift
OXON Edgington, Smith, Inkpen, Snell, Batten, Brain

Offline brigidmac

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 3,427
  • Computer incompetent but stiil trying
    • View Profile
Re: DNA shocker
« Reply #35 on: Thursday 08 October 20 13:20 BST (UK) »
Yes nanna
that's the one
It
Shows that 220cm is too high to be full third cousins .

It does suggest one has a different great grandfather or that a great grandmother took on her husband's child.

That happens too and birth registration and baptisms covered up some deceptions so are not necessarily proof .

Also if you look carefully at some trees they've added or skipped a generation .

I trust DNA results while allowing for differences
Roberts,Fellman.Macdermid MCDERMID McDiarmid Gardner Jones ,Bloch,Irvine,Hallis Stevenson ,McKay