Author Topic: workhouse entry  (Read 291 times)

Offline shona Hitchens

  • RootsChat Extra
  • **
  • Posts: 16
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
workhouse entry
« on: Wednesday 07 October 20 09:31 BST (UK) »
Hi folks can someone clarify the workhouse entry rules.
Did you have to be from that parish to enter or did it not matter?

is it correct that before 1918 if you were in a workhouse you could not vote?
and if correct did that mean you were not on the voters list?

What documents would I be looking for re 1780 to 1800 birth that will name parents as I am still unable to find a birth record for Henry Hitchens only his word in 1851 Cheshire census and a co worker on his 1861 death. Me and 42 other tree re searcher's cannot find a birth to move forward.
Henry Hitchens born between 1780 and 1800 Knowsley, Lancashire: married 1825 Davenham, Cheshire children all Northwich and dies 1861 Cheshire workhouse accident.
Thanks Shona Ford nee Hitchens

Offline Cazza47

  • RootsChat Veteran
  • *****
  • Posts: 987
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: workhouse entry
« Reply #1 on: Wednesday 07 October 20 10:38 BST (UK) »
Have you considered Henry Hitchins born 1792 in Chester, parents Thomas & Ann Hitchins?
Muckley, Routledge, Roe, Bontoft, Brumpton, Bills, Aspatria, Carlisle

Offline aghadowey

  • RootsChat Honorary
  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 48,164
    • View Profile
Re: workhouse entry
« Reply #2 on: Wednesday 07 October 20 10:46 BST (UK) »
Five pages about Henry and his origins in a previous thread (didn't read through it all to see everything already found)-
https://www.rootschat.com/forum/index.php?topic=828000.msg6920959#msg6920959
Away sorting out DNA matches... I may be gone for some time many years!


Offline shona Hitchens

  • RootsChat Extra
  • **
  • Posts: 16
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: workhouse entry
« Reply #3 on: Wednesday 07 October 20 10:57 BST (UK) »
one of my new relatives is looking at Thomas and Ann Hitchens from Chester I'm not convinced as he says Lancashire not Cheshire?

I have read though all the advice from my last thread sadly to no avail, The reason for the workhouse questions is the son Ralph was from Cheshire but died in the Manchester workhouse. I have looked at the Hitchens from Cornwall but been told we are not related and to far away so I am waiting on DNA results from Ancestry.

Online BumbleB

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 11,065
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: workhouse entry
« Reply #4 on: Wednesday 07 October 20 11:48 BST (UK) »
Don't forget that the Workhouse usually had a hospital, and it may well be that these people died in the hospital rather than the workhouse itself.

Transcriptions and NBI are merely finding aids.  They are NOT a substitute for original record entries.
Remember - "They'll be found when they want to be found" !!!
If you don't ask the question, you won't get an answer.
He/she who never made a mistake, never made anything.
Archbell - anywhere, any date
Kendall - WRY
Milner - WRY
Appleyard - WRY

Offline stanmapstone

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 25,738
    • View Profile
Re: workhouse entry
« Reply #5 on: Wednesday 07 October 20 12:09 BST (UK) »
Hi folks can someone clarify the workhouse entry rules.
Did you have to be from that parish to enter or did it not matter?


Workhouse were under the control of Poor Law Unions which covered many parishes. See
http://www.workhouses.org.uk/unions/

Stan
Mapstone, Mapston.
Census Information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Online brigidmac

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 3,189
  • Computer incompetent but stiil trying
    • View Profile
Re: workhouse entry
« Reply #6 on: Saturday 10 October 20 11:39 BST (UK) »
I wouldnt worry about cheshire/ lancashire descrepencies .sometimes people were baptised in neighbouring villages also border lines did.change I always look for my relatives in both counties
Roberts,Fellman.Macdermid MCDERMID McDiarmid Gardner Jones ,Bloch,Irvine,Hallis Stevenson ,McKay

Offline BushInn1746

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 2,804
  • Grandma's 1920 School Case
    • View Profile
Re: workhouse entry
« Reply #7 on: Saturday 10 October 20 15:10 BST (UK) »
Representation of the People Act 1918
https://www.parliament.uk/about/living-heritage/transformingsociety/electionsvoting/womenvote/case-study-the-right-to-vote/the-right-to-vote/birmingham-and-the-equal-franchise/1918-representation-of-the-people-act/

1918 Briefly the summary suggests
Women still had to be over 30 and have a property qualification to vote.
All Men over 21 had the right to vote from 1918.


is it correct that before 1918 if you were in a workhouse you could not vote?
and if correct did that mean you were not on the voters list?


Two hundred years ago, records of Selby, Yorkshire, indicate that if you were able to look after yourself or had relatives looking after you, you would usually get a Parish Out Pension at their pension age (Out Pension meaning, you were not living in the Workhouse).
 ----------
So Workhouses probably took the In-Pensioners.

If not old enough to be a Pensioner, those in the Workhouse must have
i) likely needed physical and/or mental support, or
ii) taken in to the Workhouse Infirmary when suddenly becoming temporarily unwell
(Some of these might not be on Poor Relief, but on their own and just needed looking after until getting better and going home).

Entering and Leaving the Workhouse
"It also carried with it a change in legal status until 1918, receipt of poor relief meant a loss of the right to vote."
http://www.workhouses.org.uk/life/entry.shtml
 ----------
The Selby Poor or Pauper usually got Parish Relief, some living at home.
 ----------
Check the Voters Roll or Electoral Register?

Bear in mind a 'qualifying property' to vote might not be a residence they once lived at, but could be at another place in the country, even unknown to you.

Mark