Author Topic: Help needed for deciphering some 17th century words in an inventory of goods  (Read 403 times)

Online arthurk

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Re: Help needed for deciphering some 17th century words in an inventory of goods
« Reply #18 on: Wednesday 07 October 20 15:39 BST (UK) »
In the first line, I wondered if it might be inmatary - the spelling is very phonetic, and if it's a word that the appraiser rarely used he could easily have got it a bit wrong. But it is very much open to question.

I also hesitated over breles/broles. Logically it might be expected to be broles, which sounds more like bowls, though that's a common enough word so you'd think he'd get it right. On inspecting further, where the difference is clearer it looks as though he joins 'e' to the following letter but not 'o', so it probably is breles, but exactly what that means is a mystery to me.

By the same logic does each line begin with Itom rather than Item?
Researching among others:
Bartle, Bilton, Campbell, Craven, Emmott, Harcourt, Hirst, Kellet(t), Kennedy,
Meaburn, Mennile/Meynell, Metcalf(e), Palliser, Robinson, Rutter, Shipley, Stow, Wilkinson

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Offline JenB

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Re: Help needed for deciphering some 17th century words in an inventory of goods
« Reply #19 on: Wednesday 07 October 20 15:48 BST (UK) »
Might ‘breles’ be barrels?
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Online philipsearching

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Re: Help needed for deciphering some 17th century words in an inventory of goods
« Reply #20 on: Wednesday 07 October 20 16:04 BST (UK) »
Ooooh, more suggestions.  :) :)

Allowing for the somewhat wild spelling of the writer, can we settle on a modernised version:

(MODIFIED)

This is a true and perfect inventory of the goods of
William Southam deceased March 10
Item for his wearing clothes
Item for the bed and furniture in the chamber
Item for linen
Item for a table and sideboard and chairs and stools
Item in the buttery brass and drink (bowls? barrels?)
Item for (old?) lumber

Appraised by us     Richard Southam
                              Nicholas (Boare?) - his mark
                              Henry Bass
Please help me to help you by citing sources for information.

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Online arthurk

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Re: Help needed for deciphering some 17th century words in an inventory of goods
« Reply #21 on: Wednesday 07 October 20 16:18 BST (UK) »
I agree with the suggestions above that it's sidcoberd and Cheres and stoles - possibly sideboard, then chairs and stools.
Researching among others:
Bartle, Bilton, Campbell, Craven, Emmott, Harcourt, Hirst, Kellet(t), Kennedy,
Meaburn, Mennile/Meynell, Metcalf(e), Palliser, Robinson, Rutter, Shipley, Stow, Wilkinson

Census information is Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Offline historygirl79

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Re: Help needed for deciphering some 17th century words in an inventory of goods
« Reply #22 on: Wednesday 07 October 20 18:05 BST (UK) »
Thanks, all, your knowledge and expertise is fantastic and has helped enormously.Thank you all so much for your time. It's so interesting. Imagine making an inventory for such paltry items (by today's standards). I guess back then he might have been considered wealthy and these items were much coveted. Just musing if at the bottom, the 'witness' 'Nicholas' - the author might be trying to say 'Nicholas bore his mark'?

Offline goldie61

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Re: Help needed for deciphering some 17th century words in an inventory of goods
« Reply #23 on: Wednesday 07 October 20 21:35 BST (UK) »
Just musing if at the bottom, the 'witness' 'Nicholas' - the author might be trying to say 'Nicholas bore his mark'?

No I don't think so. I've never seen that phrase used in hundred of inventories and wills.
It is his surname.  Quite surprisingly, considering the spellings here, both the names 'Nickolas' and 'Booare' have capital letters. Not always the case at all with some writers.
Nickolas has made his 'mark' - a cross '+',  in between 'Nickolas' and 'Booare'.
Just to be accurate, 'mark' is written 'marck'.
Lane, Burgess: Cheshire. Finney, Rogers, Gilman:Derbys
Cochran, Nicol, Paton, Bruce:Scotland. Bertolle:London
Bainbridge, Christman, Jeffs: Staffs

Online philipsearching

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Re: Help needed for deciphering some 17th century words in an inventory of goods
« Reply #24 on: Thursday 08 October 20 14:56 BST (UK) »
Imagine making an inventory for such paltry items (by today's standards). I guess back then he might have been considered wealthy and these items were much coveted.


Home ownership or leasehold was out of reach of most working class people and upward social mobility was difficult.  Working class people's possessions would mostly have comprised furniture, cooking utensils, tableware, bed linen, clothes and tools of their trade.  Before the Industrial Revolution led to mass production these items were all handmade and relatively scarce and expensive.

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines lumber as:
1 : surplus or disused articles (such as furniture) that are stored away
2a : timber or logs especially when dressed for use
  b : any of various structural materials prepared in a form similar to lumber

Philip
Please help me to help you by citing sources for information.

Census information is Crown Copyright http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk