Author Topic: Ships and their Journeys  (Read 376 times)

Online Maiden Stone

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Re: In desperate need of help
« Reply #9 on: Thursday 08 October 20 21:50 BST (UK) »
How about  Brig Jessie of Ayr

I thought it was Lady Gordon of Maryport.  But perhaps Graham is correct. I offer it as an alternative.
If 4th ship is "John" then 1st could be "Jessie".
I won't argue for Lady Graham. The only part I'm sure about is "Lady G".

There was a "Lady Gordon" of Maryport in 1853 on the ship list posted by Cath. Vessels I looked at on the list seemed to be from 2nd half of 19thC. Too many named "Jessie", "John" and "Castle...." Also a long list beginning with "Oran". I'm not even sure if the first letter is O.
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Offline bbart

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Re: In desperate need of help
« Reply #10 on: Thursday 08 October 20 22:01 BST (UK) »
In 1822 there is mention of a Brig Barrisie of Troon.  On this particular trip, she was sailing to Dublin, in case that helps figure out the destination.

Online Maiden Stone

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Re: In desperate need of help
« Reply #11 on: Thursday 08 October 20 22:16 BST (UK) »

        Brig Ba..... of Troon                           Chief Mate       Go......  (Gourock?)
        Ship Orantall   -*                               Chief Mate       Glasgow to East Indies
Is the last word in the last column of the Troon ship "trade"? "Coastal trade"?
Taking into account geography, could the name of the other ship begin with Aran? Arran is the big island opposite Troon in the Firth of Clyde.  :-\
Just seen bbart's post about the brig Barrisie of Troon sailing to Dublin. I was actually wondering if "Coastal trade" included Ireland. It's only a short trip to N.E. Ireland. People from N. Ireland moved to Ayrshire to work as weavers. Barassie was a village which is a suburb of Troon.
Edit. "Coasting trade" ?
I'm having 2nd thoughts about Quebec as destination for 1st voyage. I can't read what's written after it, outside the column.
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Offline bbart

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Re: In desperate need of help
« Reply #12 on: Thursday 08 October 20 22:33 BST (UK) »

Is the last word in the last column of the Troon ship "trade"? "Coastal trade"?
Edit. "Coasting trade" ?

That makes more sense than what I was seeing, which was Counting Trade!

Online Maiden Stone

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Re: In desperate need of help
« Reply #13 on: Thursday 08 October 20 23:03 BST (UK) »
I also read it as "Counting Trade" at one point and wondered if it was a seafaring or local term.
Dictionary definition; coasting trade - between ports of same coast. There were vessels known as coasters.
Plenty of ports on the west coast mainland and islands and peninsulas. A nineteenth century equivalent of "Vital Spark" puffer.
Coal was mined in Ayrshire + other counties in the region. 
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Offline bbart

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Re: In desperate need of help
« Reply #14 on: Thursday 08 October 20 23:03 BST (UK) »
Found an article on the ship John of Greenock in 1826 referring to how many whales it caught. Other articles on it always refer to it as a fishing ship, but finally found one that actually mentioned whaling.

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Re: In desperate need of help
« Reply #15 on: Thursday 08 October 20 23:52 BST (UK) »
"Lancaster Gazette" has shipping news of the era. Lancaster used to be a busy port. Ships from Glasgow and Port Glasgow with whiskey, molasses and "sundries" (1826). A vessel "William Jameson", registered at Maryport, employed in the timber trade, voyage from Ulverston (Lancashire) to Glasgow (1827).
There was a Parliamentary Select Committee on the state of the coal trade 1825; considered duty on sea-borne coal.
A particular type of stone (water stone?) from Ayrshire was advertised in a Liverpool newspaper. It would have been transported by sea.   
Did sailors think that whales were fish?
Whalebone for corsets, oil for lamps. 
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Re: In desperate need of help
« Reply #16 on: Friday 09 October 20 00:31 BST (UK) »
Website "Scottish Built Ships - The History of Shipbuilding in Scotland"
https://www.clydeships.co.uk
"Barassie" built 1817, builder John Connell. Vessel type cargo. Propulsion sailing vessel.  Looking up John Connell in the list of shipbuilders shows him at Troon.
Several vessels named Jessie including 1 built at Greenock 1810 by John Cunningham. John Cunningham on the shipbuilders' list was at Saltcoats which is further up the Ayrshire coast from Ayr and Troon.
There was a "Margery" 1814 built by Archibald McLachlan. This was a passenger paddle steamer. I don't know if that fits with "North American Trade". 
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