Author Topic: consecrated/unconsecrated cemetery sections - a simple explanation  (Read 367 times)

Offline Tickettyboo

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consecrated/unconsecrated cemetery sections - a simple explanation
« on: Friday 09 October 20 16:04 BST (UK) »
Sometimes people get confused by the terms 'consecrated' and 'unconsecrated' sections of cemeteries and they sometimes assume that 'buried in an unconsecrated section' equates to their ancestor having taken their own lives - which is highly unlikely to have been the case.

I was looking at the Newcastle upon Tyne Cemeteries dept. site and saw the simplest explanation I have seen.
(paraphrased to pick out the main points and avoid infringing copyright )

When most cemeteries were opened, certain parts were formally blessed by representatives  of the Church of England, and this consecrated the ground prior to any burials.

In recognition of the fact that people from other religious denominations would also wish to be buried in the cemeteries, some areas were left unconsecrated by the Church of England.

When a burial takes place in an unconsecrated part of the cemetery, the minister representing the religious belief of the deceased conducts a service at the graveside, thereby blessing that individual grave at the time of burial.

I know there are cases where the deceased had no religious belief at all, so a minister would not be involved and the grave would not be blessed which would be in accordance with the deceased's beliefs/wishes.

Boo

Offline ThrelfallYorky

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Re: consecrated/unconsecrated cemetery sections - a simple explanation
« Reply #1 on: Friday 09 October 20 16:25 BST (UK) »
How very logical. Well explained. thank you.
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Offline Ray T

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Re: consecrated/unconsecrated cemetery sections - a simple explanation
« Reply #2 on: Friday 09 October 20 17:38 BST (UK) »
Unfortunately, it all sounds very illogical to me! Exactly how did the person doing the blessing define the area which he (I assume it was a “he” in those days) was blessing and how did he stop that blessing from spilling out onto the areas he was not intending to bless?

I assume those prepared to be buried in the uncosecrated ground wouldn’t have been bothered (or words to that effect!).


Offline Erato

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Re: consecrated/unconsecrated cemetery sections - a simple explanation
« Reply #3 on: Friday 09 October 20 18:04 BST (UK) »
What is the benefit of being buried in 'consecrated' ground?
Wiltshire:  Banks, Taylor
Somerset:  Duddridge, Richards, Barnard, Pillinger
Gloucestershire:  Barnard, Marsh, Crossman
Bristol:  Banks, Duddridge, Barnard
Down:  Ennis, McGee
Wicklow:  Chapman, Pepper
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Offline Tickettyboo

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Re: consecrated/unconsecrated cemetery sections - a simple explanation
« Reply #4 on: Friday 09 October 20 18:06 BST (UK) »
What is the benefit of being buried in 'consecrated' ground?

I suppose that would depend on the individual beliefs and wishes of the deceased.

Boo

Offline Tickettyboo

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Re: consecrated/unconsecrated cemetery sections - a simple explanation
« Reply #5 on: Friday 09 October 20 18:12 BST (UK) »
Unfortunately, it all sounds very illogical to me! Exactly how did the person doing the blessing define the area which he (I assume it was a “he” in those days) was blessing and how did he stop that blessing from spilling out onto the areas he was not intending to bless?

I assume those prepared to be buried in the uncosecrated ground wouldn’t have been bothered (or words to that effect!).

My post was intended  to show the difference between the terms consecrated and unconsecrated in relation to cemetery sections. The explanation of 'that' seemed (at least to me) perfectly logical.

Boo






Offline Ray T

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Re: consecrated/unconsecrated cemetery sections - a simple explanation
« Reply #6 on: Friday 09 October 20 18:35 BST (UK) »
I fully accept that but it also highlights the illogicality of such processes.

Offline JenB

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Re: consecrated/unconsecrated cemetery sections - a simple explanation
« Reply #7 on: Friday 09 October 20 18:39 BST (UK) »
Thank you Boo, very useful We often have enquiries on Rootschat about the difference between 'Consecrated and 'Unconsecrated' sections.
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Offline *Sandra*

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Re: consecrated/unconsecrated cemetery sections - a simple explanation
« Reply #8 on: Friday 09 October 20 20:04 BST (UK) »
Thank you Boo, very useful We often have enquiries on Rootschat about the difference between 'Consecrated and 'Unconsecrated' sections.

Thanks for posting Boo that is very useful.

Agree with JenB that RootsChat have had lots of threads over the years asking that same question.
Just for interest here are a couple of examples - probably loads more.

https://www.rootschat.com/forum/index.php?topic=493821.0

https://www.rootschat.com/forum/index.php?topic=490979.0

Sandra

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