Author Topic: Convict Ship “Adelaide”  (Read 188 times)

Offline Arlene Campbell

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Convict Ship “Adelaide”
« on: Saturday 21 November 20 04:59 GMT (UK) »
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Hi everyone,

I’m trying to find an illustration of the convict ship Adelaide (1849) - or a similar type vessel.

On several sites it’s only described as a Rig Type: S

Many thanks
Arlene

Offline AllanUK

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Re: Convict Ship “Adelaide”
« Reply #1 on: Saturday 21 November 20 11:42 GMT (UK) »

Offline AllanUK

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Re: Convict Ship “Adelaide”
« Reply #2 on: Saturday 21 November 20 12:22 GMT (UK) »
‘The Adelaide was a 640-ton teak sailing ship built in Calcutta in 1832. The owner was J Somes of London. In 1839 it sailed to New Zealand under Captain William Campbell. It was among a group of ships carrying settlers which were to rendezvous at Port Hardy on d'Urville Island on 10 January 1840. They were sent after the Oriental. The others in the group were the Aurora, Duke of Roxburgh, and Bengal Merchant, plus a freight vessel, the Glenbervie. At the rendezvous they were be told of their final destination. The Adelaide had 176 settlers on board. She sailed from London on 18 September 1839 and arrived at Port Nicholson on 7 March 1840. She arrived at about 4pm in the company of the Tory and Glenbervie.
She made three voyages bringing convicts arriving on 8 August 1849 (300 to Port Phillip, Tasmania), 16 April 1855 (260 to Western Australia), and 13 May 1863 (210 to Gibraltar, Australia).’

The ship Aurora was also used as a convict ship. The Aurora was a three masted barque, a reasonably fast sailing ship of the day.

‘My’ convict was transported on the Aurora in 1835 and carried 300 convicts, the Adelaide carried 304 convicts so it is highly possible that the Adelaide was also a barque. The image attached is of unknown sailing barque from that era.



Offline AllanUK

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Re: Convict Ship “Adelaide”
« Reply #3 on: Saturday 21 November 20 14:25 GMT (UK) »
Thought that I would search Australian newspapers for 1849 for the arrival of the Adelaide in Tasmania then in Sydney -- all articles refer to the Adelaide as 'the ship Adelaide'.

Moving on, I searched the Australian newspapers for the next journey of the Adelaide carrying convicts (i.e.1855). The Perth Gazette announced the arrival of the Adelaide and that it's captain was called Longman (see image attached). Carrying on with my search, I found a reference to the Adelaide advertising for passengers and cargo for it's return trip. This advert carries the captains name as Longman but more importantly, it shows that the Adelaide is 'a frigate built ship'.

I have attached images of both newspaper clippings and also an image of a frigate called the Northfleet circa 1853.

Offline hanes teulu

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Re: Convict Ship “Adelaide”
« Reply #4 on: Saturday 21 November 20 15:03 GMT (UK) »
Shipping Mercantile Gazette, 18 Aug 1849

WEYMOUTH-PORTLAND ROADS - Aug17th, Wind w., to N N W., moderate fine
Sailed - the convict ship, Adelaide, Wharton, from London for Hobart Town, with mail, all well

Lloyds Register 1849
Ship - Adelaide; Master - Wharton; Tons 640; Built - Calcutta; Year - 1832; Owners - J & F Somes
S. Wales, Somerset, Devon - Oxenham

Aberavon - Hopkin/s, Jenkins, Thomas
St. Brides/Wick - Jenkins
Llanblethian -  Price
Abergwynfi -  Han(d)ford
Pontardawe -  Lewis.

Offline Arlene Campbell

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Re: Convict Ship “Adelaide”
« Reply #5 on: Saturday 21 November 20 23:31 GMT (UK) »
Thanks Allan!

This is likely the closest i will get. 

Arlene :)
X


‘The Adelaide was a 640-ton teak sailing ship built in Calcutta in 1832. The owner was J Somes of London. In 1839 it sailed to New Zealand under Captain William Campbell. It was among a group of ships carrying settlers which were to rendezvous at Port Hardy on d'Urville Island on 10 January 1840. They were sent after the Oriental. The others in the group were the Aurora, Duke of Roxburgh, and Bengal Merchant, plus a freight vessel, the Glenbervie. At the rendezvous they were be told of their final destination. The Adelaide had 176 settlers on board. She sailed from London on 18 September 1839 and arrived at Port Nicholson on 7 March 1840. She arrived at about 4pm in the company of the Tory and Glenbervie.
She made three voyages bringing convicts arriving on 8 August 1849 (300 to Port Phillip, Tasmania), 16 April 1855 (260 to Western Australia), and 13 May 1863 (210 to Gibraltar, Australia).’

The ship Aurora was also used as a convict ship. The Aurora was a three masted barque, a reasonably fast sailing ship of the day.

‘My’ convict was transported on the Aurora in 1835 and carried 300 convicts, the Adelaide carried 304 convicts so it is highly possible that the Adelaide was also a barque. The image attached is of unknown sailing barque from that era.