Author Topic: Travel 1860s  (Read 386 times)

Online Familysearch

  • RootsChat Senior
  • ****
  • Posts: 261
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Travel 1860s
« on: Wednesday 30 December 20 22:11 GMT (UK) »
Reading a book ("The Five" as recommended on Rootschat) where one of the families travelled from Wolverhampton to London by canal barge.

This got me wondering about travel in the 1860s.  In my tree I have a family who travelled from Glasgow to Redditch, Worcestershire in 1865 or 1866.  This is a fairly accurate date. One of their children was born Glasgow 7 May 1865, buried August 1866 Redditch.

My question is How did they travel? There were railway stations in Glasgow and Redditch at that time.

Worcester & Birmingham canal runs near Redditch at Tardebigge. there is a canal system around Glasgow.

Just wondering what you all think - there maybe even a canals expert out there who would know exactly!!

I am thinking canal travel would be cheaper than rail. (The child that died was the youngest of four)

FS

Online KGarrad

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 24,102
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Travel 1860s
« Reply #1 on: Wednesday 30 December 20 22:35 GMT (UK) »
Redditch railway station opened on 18 Sept 1859.
Operated by the Midland Railway.
Garrad (Suffolk, Essex, Somerset), Crocker (Somerset), Vanstone (Devon, Jersey), Sims (Wiltshire), Bridger (Kent)

Offline Maiden Stone

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 4,753
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Travel 1860s
« Reply #2 on: Wednesday 30 December 20 22:44 GMT (UK) »
3rd class rail fare was 1 penny per mile by law, 1844. I don't know what it was in 1860's. That works out at approximately 1 for an adult for the journey, depending on route.
https://blog.railwaymuseum.org.uk/fares-fare/
Cowban


Online Familysearch

  • RootsChat Senior
  • ****
  • Posts: 261
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Travel 1860s
« Reply #3 on: Thursday 31 December 20 14:43 GMT (UK) »
Thank you both. Interesting website MS.
I'm thinking rail would be the choice, but will try to investigate the canal system.  I would think road would be out of the question.
FS

Online Skoosh

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 5,455
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Travel 1860s
« Reply #4 on: Thursday 31 December 20 15:55 GMT (UK) »
No canal link. it would be by train, there was also a steamer link from the Clyde to Liverpool, maybe cheaper?   If he was a glassworker that might be the reason for the move?

https://liverpoolnauticalresearchsociety.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/Article-Loss-of-the-Steamer-Orion.pdf

Skoosh.

Online Familysearch

  • RootsChat Senior
  • ****
  • Posts: 261
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Travel 1860s
« Reply #5 on: Thursday 31 December 20 17:37 GMT (UK) »
Another interesting insight into travel in days past.

The man was a fishing rod maker. Redditch had a thriving industry in manufacture of rods, but also needles and hooks.

FS

Offline Maiden Stone

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 4,753
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Travel 1860s
« Reply #6 on: Friday 01 January 21 16:13 GMT (UK) »
Newspaper adverts may give you an idea of fares.
Irish labourers went over to Britain each summer to work and returned home for winter. Cheap steamer and rail fares were available.
Cowban

Online Skoosh

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 5,455
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Travel 1860s
« Reply #7 on: Monday 11 January 21 14:47 GMT (UK) »
Anent the steamer route to Liverpool from the Clyde then by canal boat to the Black Country pre the railways, there was a packet from Liverpool to Ellesmere Port, then by canal to Chester & Nantwich, the Birmingham & Liverpool Junction Canal was completed in 1835.
 An interesting excursion! ;D

Bests,
Skoosh.