Author Topic: Family Precedence.  (Read 645 times)

Offline Marmaduke 123

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Re: Family Precedence.
« Reply #9 on: Friday 01 January 21 14:09 GMT (UK) »
I think it would depend on how close a person was to the deceased, rather than their actual relationship. In my case, I very rarely see or contact any of my first cousins, but feel close to some of my nieces, and my husband's nieces.
Halifax/Huddersfield area West Yorkshire
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Offline Jebber

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Re: Family Precedence.
« Reply #10 on: Friday 01 January 21 16:38 GMT (UK) »
There is no such thing as precedence in this instance, it would be entirely up to the bereaved widow/widower or next of kin, whoever is in charge of the arrangements to  invite who they want. Everyone else should respect their wishes.
CHOULES All ,  COKER Harwich Essex & Rochester Kent 
COLE Gt. Oakley, & Lt. Oakley, Essex.
DUNCAN Kent
EVERITT Colchester,  Dovercourt & Harwich Essex
GULLIVER/GULLOFER Fifehead Magdalen Dorset
HORSCROFT Kent.
KING Sturminster Newton, Dorset. MONK Odiham Ham.
SCOTT Wrabness, Essex
WILKINS Stour Provost, Dorset.
WICKHAM All in North Essex.
WICKHAM Medway Towns, Kent from 1880
WICKHAM, Ipswich, Suffolk.

Offline Familysearch

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Re: Family Precedence.
« Reply #11 on: Friday 01 January 21 17:02 GMT (UK) »
Sadly, I have attended five funerals this year.  All of them have been via Zoom links.  Under normal circumstances I would have not been able to attend two of them due to distance.  One of the occasions had friends and relatives from USA and Australia. So it does have its advantages to have these new technologies, and may well be the way forward in the future.

My thought on the original question - it certainly depends on the person making the arrangements.  They will know who the deceased was closest to, and who would want to attend in person. No-one should feel they have a "right" to attend. That could mean that all the relatives are left out, and close friends included.

FS


Offline Skoosh

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Re: Family Precedence.
« Reply #12 on: Saturday 02 January 21 20:54 GMT (UK) »
At a burial in Scotland there are numbered cords for lowering the coffin, people selected for a cord are given a card by the undertaker with a wee plan of the coffin and the numbered positions of the cords. This honour is entirely decided by the family beforehand.

Skoosh.

Offline Gadget

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Re: Family Precedence.
« Reply #13 on: Saturday 02 January 21 21:29 GMT (UK) »
I'm sure it was bands and cords when I was up their, Skoosh. OH took one or other a few times. It tended to be clsoe family, then neighbours and friends.
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