Author Topic: Lover? Joker? Mystery word in an 1824 diary  (Read 655 times)

Offline Simsam

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Lover? Joker? Mystery word in an 1824 diary
« on: Saturday 02 January 21 12:43 GMT (UK) »
Hello, I would be grateful for any assistance with the following please, which is from an 1824 diary of a journey to the Mediterranean. With earlier help, I have deciphered most of it, but am left unsure about the first word of the second page below. The captain referred to here is called John.

The text otherwise reads... "The breeze continued to favour us the whole of this day. Had a good laugh at the expense of ___ with the Captain, who I now began to suspect is a general [Lover]. He spoke highly of the Misses Dallas of Manchester whom he met at a ball at Parkgate on 7th and 8th October, and intends calling upon them when he next trips to Manchester."

Lover? Joker? Louis?
Brown (Chester)
Monk (Neston, Parkgate)
Humfrey (Chester)

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Re: Lover? Joker? Mystery word in an 1824 diary
« Reply #1 on: Saturday 02 January 21 12:56 GMT (UK) »
It looks like Lo--r.

The v in favor four lines above is different, though of course that doesn't mean this is not a v too.

Near what you think might be an e, looks to be a smudge or some ink from the other side of the paper, which makes it look e like.  :) I can't really see an e - possibly an rr?  :-\

Since you suggested the word "Lover" I keep seeing that. I can't think what would make sense in this context unless it is an obsolete word or expression.



Offline Treetotal

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Re: Lover? Joker? Mystery word in an 1824 diary
« Reply #2 on: Saturday 02 January 21 12:57 GMT (UK) »
Lover...he goes on to say "he spoke highly of the misses"
The only other word could be loser but it doesn't fit with the context.
Carol
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Offline *Sandra*

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Re: Lover? Joker? Mystery word in an 1824 diary
« Reply #3 on: Saturday 02 January 21 13:16 GMT (UK) »

"Lover"

Sandra
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Offline manukarik

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Re: Lover? Joker? Mystery word in an 1824 diary
« Reply #4 on: Saturday 02 January 21 13:35 GMT (UK) »
I've tried to think of the other options - but maybe because you planted the seed of "lover" that is all I can see. The writer has 2 styles for the letter e. The e used here looks like the e on the previous page (first line) in the word "each".

It's interesting to see the spelling of "favor", which made me think "American writer", but there were some famous British writers who used that spelling. Interesting too to see the use of the long s.

Online oldfashionedgirl

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Re: Lover? Joker? Mystery word in an 1824 diary
« Reply #5 on: Saturday 02 January 21 13:57 GMT (UK) »
Could it be an abbreviation for Lieutenant as they are talking previously of the Captain and as was said before there was an American spelling. General Lieutenant is an American rank.
Maybe they scribbled it as they were unsure of the spelling ?

Offline Albufera32

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Re: Lover? Joker? Mystery word in an 1824 diary
« Reply #6 on: Saturday 02 January 21 14:11 GMT (UK) »
Given that the previous comment is that the writer "had a laugh at the expense of _______ with the Capt" who they now "began to suspect" is a general something, I would suggest "louse" fits the context rather well. The writer is just beginning to realise that the Captain being referred to is an unpleasant individual ie a louse, who makes fun of others.

It also fits with the observation of others that the writer may be American, since I believe "louse" to be an American term.
Howie (Riccarton Ayrshire)
McNeil/ McNeill (Argyll)
Main (Airdrie Lanarkshire)
Grant (Lanarkshire and Bo'ness)
More (Lanarkshire)
Ure (Polmont)
Colligan (Lanarkshire)
Drinnan (New Zealand)

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Re: Lover? Joker? Mystery word in an 1824 diary
« Reply #7 on: Saturday 02 January 21 14:14 GMT (UK) »
If the word is Lover ... what is a "General Lover"?


Offline Karen McDonald

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Re: Lover? Joker? Mystery word in an 1824 diary
« Reply #8 on: Saturday 02 January 21 14:26 GMT (UK) »
If the word is Lover ... what is a "General Lover"?

That's what I was thinking!

The last letter could well be a "t" - compare with (whom he) met.

I suppose it wouldn't be Lout?!

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Karen
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