Author Topic: Deciphering an 18th Century will  (Read 344 times)

Offline Bookbox

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Re: Deciphering an 18th Century will
« Reply #18 on: Wednesday 13 January 21 10:00 GMT (UK) »
PCC = Prerogative Court of Canterbury. Apologies for using an unexplained abbreviation.

Before 1858 all wills were proved in church courts, not in civil courts. The PCC was just one of many such courts, and the highest. It had jurisdiction over most of the southern part of England and Wales, and could also handle referrals from other probate courts.

The PCC probate records (wills etc.) are held at the National Archives. Those that you find online are copies, entered in the probate registers by clerks who were trained in this particular style of handwriting.

Offline littlemissx77

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Re: Deciphering an 18th Century will
« Reply #19 on: Wednesday 13 January 21 10:27 GMT (UK) »
So interesting and informative, thank you

Offline Ian Nelson

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Re: Deciphering an 18th Century will
« Reply #20 on: Wednesday 13 January 21 11:21 GMT (UK) »
Thanks, is that an old Celtic (Scottish) word for a lady fiend

I guess it has the same origin as Queen.   In Aberdeenshire they have ' Quines & Loons ', girls & boys.
From my early youth I knew a girl from Fife and she was nicknamed Queenie by her Grandmother, my neighbour, who had moved to the west coast of Scotland, yet her name was Christine.  I asked the granny and was told all girls were quines.  I was a befuddled 8 year old then, before and after.
Norfolk, Nelsons of Gt Ryburgh, Gooch, Howman, Ainger, Couzens, Batrick (Norfolk & Dorset), Tubby ( also of Yorkshire) Cathcarts of Ireland, Lancashire & Isle of Wight) Dickinsons of Morecambe and Lancaster. Proctor & Threlfall of Westmoreland and Lancs, Wilson of Poulton-le-Sands. Mitchells of Isle of Wight. Hair of Ayrshire, Williamson of Tradeston, Glasgow. Nelsons in Australia with Haywards Heath connections.