Author Topic: Dna matches  (Read 482 times)

Offline Algrass62

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Dna matches
« on: Sunday 17 January 21 04:25 GMT (UK) »
Hi, Can anyone tell me how do you know which cm's matches are worthwhile chasing. The highest one is 80cm.
Thankyou

Alistair   

Offline Ruskie

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Re: Dna matches
« Reply #1 on: Sunday 17 January 21 05:00 GMT (UK) »
Hi Alastair,

80cm is quite low for a “highest” match.  :-\

You could enter it into this tool to give you a rough guide:
https://dnapainter.com/tools/sharedcmv4

It would still be worth contacting your 80cm match to firstly, see if they bother to respond (many dont), and secondly, to see if they are willing to work with you to find out your connection. Even their current location (or knowing where their ancestors lived a couple of generations ago) might help you.




Offline Algrass62

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Re: Dna matches
« Reply #2 on: Sunday 17 January 21 05:32 GMT (UK) »
Thanks Ruskie


Offline Ruskie

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Re: Dna matches
« Reply #3 on: Sunday 17 January 21 05:44 GMT (UK) »
I’m sure someone whose knows their way around Ancestry DNA will be along to help you soon.  :)

Offline squawki11

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Re: Dna matches
« Reply #4 on: Monday 18 January 21 09:48 GMT (UK) »
If your highest match is 80cM that might suggest that very few of your relatives have tested. You must ensure your own tree is linked to your DNA results and if possible build your tree as far back as you can, say, to 4ggp at least. Contact your shared matches and hope they respond. Use clustering to visually sort your matches, i.e. Collins/Leeds from DNAGedcom. Upload your raw data to MyHeritage and everywhere else. Read up everything you can and persevere.

Offline ggrocott

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Re: Dna matches
« Reply #5 on: Monday 18 January 21 10:52 GMT (UK) »
Personally I try and check out as many of them as I can, particularly if they have a tree I can look at and if they have shared matches.  The shared matches give you an idea of where they fit in. 

Built your own tree as high and wide as you can as well.



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Offline Algrass62

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Re: Dna matches
« Reply #6 on: Monday 18 January 21 11:58 GMT (UK) »
Thankyou very much, my tree goes back to1465 and I try to include as many families as I can and verify their relationships.

Regards
Alistair

Offline Ruskie

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Re: Dna matches
« Reply #7 on: Monday 18 January 21 12:28 GMT (UK) »
On My Heritage sign in to your account.
Along the top to  the right you will see a red "DNA."
This has a pull down menu.
Select "Tools."
The one in the middle is "Autoclusters."
Click on "Explore."
You will be emailed an autocluster report in a few hours.

This will put your matches into groups. Everyone in each group matches with each other.

I think once you receive your mother's DNA results, it might fit into place a bit more for you.

Offline Rosinish

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Re: Dna matches
« Reply #8 on: Monday 18 January 21 13:24 GMT (UK) »
Alistair,

I found for unknown matches, using 'The LEEDS Method' with an excel spreadsheet was very helpful regardless of being time consuming as it shows up better for viewing who fits where better.

It's worth reading about it & trying it especially when you have instances of not knowing much on your paternal line.

https://www.yourdnaguide.com/leeds-method

https://www.danaleeds.com/dna-color-clustering-the-leeds-method-for-easily-visualizing-matches/

Let us know how you get on, whether you find any paternal matches?


Annie

South Uist, Inverness-shire, Scotland:- Bowie, Campbell, Cumming, Currie

Ireland:- Cullen, Flannigan (Derry), Donahoe/Donaghue (variants) (Cork), McCrate (Tipperary), Mellon, Tol(l)and (Donegal & Tyrone)

Newcastle-on-Tyne/Durham (Northumberland):- Harrison, Jude, Kemp, Lunn, Mellon, Robson, Stirling

Kettering, Northampton:- MacKinnon

Canada:- Callaghan, Cumming, MacPhee

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