Author Topic: Ww2 identification arm bands  (Read 501 times)

Online Ruskie

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Re: Ww2 identification arm bands
« Reply #9 on: Tuesday 02 February 21 03:56 GMT (UK) »
Do you think there are initials TK? I’m not sure I see that ... but the fabric is bent somewhat.

Just as homsexuals wouldn’t have been termed “gay” in that era, I’m not sure the term “trans...” would have been used either. I couldn’t find anything on the internet about this but admit to only having a quick look. I would expect there to be plenty of information about the origins and useage of these terms.

Regarding rarity, it looks delicate and I imagine they would have been destroyed at the earliest opportunity, so perhaps quite rare. An interesting item.

Offline Kiltpin

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Re: Ww2 identification arm bands
« Reply #10 on: Tuesday 02 February 21 10:49 GMT (UK) »
Of course, individual camps had their own methods and codes for identification, but I am struggling to see any letter in the triangle.   

All the examples in the wikipedia page show very clear cut identifiable letters. It almost looks like one letter on top of another - but I can't identify either one. Is it possible that the "letter" has bled onto it from another piece of fabric? 

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Chas
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Offline brigidmac

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Re: Ww2 identification arm bands
« Reply #11 on: Thursday 04 February 21 19:41 GMT (UK) »
Thanks for your replies can I send link to FB page where there are a few more images and discussion

I saw the word Transsexual woman  in one of the links that was posted

Yes I think the letter could be a T with top.detached with age .

I think it would be nice to do some sort of tribute to this unknown person
Roberts,Fellman.Macdermid smith jones,Bloch,Irvine,Hallis Stevenson


Online John915

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Re: Ww2 identification arm bands
« Reply #12 on: Thursday 04 February 21 22:24 GMT (UK) »
Good evening,

After some research I believe this is probably pre war. The pink triangles were worn almost exclusively by German males. Convicted of homosexuality under section 175 of the German penal code. Under the nazis this covered not just the sexual act but many other innocent signs of affection between men. After coming to power the nazis forced many criminals and others to wear armbands showing everyone what they were.

I can find no evidence of arm bands being worn in the camps. The triangles were sewn to the front left breast and down the right leg. They always had the prisoners no above and could have one or more other symbols below it. The letter/s may have a local meaning and appear to be printed on not sewn.

John915
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Offline brigidmac

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Re: Ww2 identification arm bands
« Reply #13 on: Monday 15 February 21 04:54 GMT (UK) »
Thanks for that extra information John
May. I copy and add to the other site where story is mentioned ?
Roberts,Fellman.Macdermid smith jones,Bloch,Irvine,Hallis Stevenson