Author Topic: Army 1920ís, Ireland and Germany  (Read 297 times)

Offline Maiden Stone

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Re: Army 1920ís, Ireland and Germany
« Reply #9 on: Saturday 06 March 21 20:30 GMT (UK) »
Civil Authorities (Special Powers) Act 1922 passed by N.I. government. Known as "the flogging Act" as one of the provisions was punishment of male offenders by whipping. Other provisions included internment, curfews, breaking up assemblies, blocking roads, lanes &c and ferries, censorship, taking over private property, and capital punishment. Offences included having or using a motor or other cycle or motor car without a permit from the civil authorities. Internment lasted 1922-24; it was used again in 1938 and 1971. The Civil Authorities (Special Powers) Act was renewed annually until 1925 when it was made permanent to avoid having to debate the renewal and argue with the small number of Nationalist members of the Stormont Parliament. The Act was repealed in 1973 when the Stormont parliament was abolished.
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Offline Lindyloowho

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Re: Army 1920ís, Ireland and Germany
« Reply #10 on: Saturday 06 March 21 20:37 GMT (UK) »
Many thanks for all the responses. 
So it would seem Ballykinlar was used as a prison camp even after 1921 - and based on Maiden Stones finding below, no wonder my poor dad was horrified by what he saw as an 18 year old soldier just left home😢

Offline Maiden Stone

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Re: Army 1920ís, Ireland and Germany
« Reply #11 on: Saturday 06 March 21 20:41 GMT (UK) »

Balykinlar, County Down aka Abercorn Barracks. The new Northern Ireland government continued to use it as an internment camp after 1921. A former inmate, Louis Walsh who became a judge, wrote a book about it. Another source is "Internment Northern Ireland 1922-1961" by John McGuffin.

Take into account bias/viewpoint of authors when reading. Chapters of John McGuffin's book are on internet. Chapters 5 & 14 may be of interest. McGufffin was involved in the civil rights movement in NI in 1960s and was interned. He was an anarchist and a Protestant. Died 2002, obits online.
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Offline Maiden Stone

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Re: Army 1920ís, Ireland and Germany
« Reply #12 on: Saturday 06 March 21 21:27 GMT (UK) »

So it would seem Ballykinlar was used as a prison camp even after 1921 - and based on Maiden Stones finding below, no wonder my poor dad was horrified by what he saw as an 18 year old soldier just left home😢

A ship was initially used for interned prisoners in 1922. There were too many prisoners (mostly nationalist) so some were transferred to other prisons.
Your dad's regiment may have been required to maintain order anywhere in the province.
 Reading contemporary newspapers may give you an idea of what was happening but they need to be read with a dose of salt as they were politically biased + those published in NI were subject to censorship under the Civil Authorities (Special Powers) Act 1922. The Act can be read online; there are 35 clauses.
To understand the thinking, decisions, actions and fears of NI and UK governments you also need to know about events in Ireland, Britain and Europe in that decade and the preceding one. Trades unionism, strikes (1913, 1926), nationalism, the Great War, Russian Revolutions & civil wars, Irish nationalism, War of Independence and Civil War.   
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Offline Lindyloowho

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Re: Army 1920ís, Ireland and Germany
« Reply #13 on: Sunday 07 March 21 13:37 GMT (UK) »
Again, thank you.  Growing up in England during the 60/70ís obviously I was aware of the problems in Ireland, but admit to being woefully ignorant of anything before that. His service record does states specifically Ballykinlar so I have to believe he was stationed at the actual camp.

I will be looking online for more resources to gain a better understanding of what was happening - and will keep an open mind!🤨