Author Topic: Understanding what numbers/abbreviations mean on war records  (Read 229 times)

Offline Nellieginn

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Understanding what numbers/abbreviations mean on war records
« on: Wednesday 31 March 21 09:57 BST (UK) »
Researching through the Games family from Talgarth, there's mention of an age discrepancy. It's not very clear, but I think it says he belongs to the 15th R Batty, RFA, and the note sent says that his medical was A.I, having attained the age of 19.  The next note mentions his actual birthday and that they are to  "deal with this man in accordance with A.C.I 470 of 1918".

Does anyone know what all the abbreviations mean please?
Thank you

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Re: Understanding what numbers/abbreviations mean on war records
« Reply #1 on: Wednesday 31 March 21 10:24 BST (UK) »
ACI is probably this one:

ACI : Army Council Instruction

RFA : Royal Field Artillery

A1 I assume probably means that he was very fit.

15th R Batty will be whatever it was he joined.  Where did you find the record?

Added: This is where I found the abbreviations:-
https://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/soldiers/a-soldiers-life-1914-1918/common-british-army-acronyms-and-abbreviations-of-the-first-world-war/
Ashford: Somerset, London
England: Devon, London, New Zealand
Holdway: Wiltshire
Hooper: Bristol, Somerset
Knowling: Devon, London
Southcott: Devon, China
Strong: Wiltshire
Watson: Cambridgeshire
White: Bristol
Windo - Gloucestershire, Somerset, Wiltshire

Offline Nellieginn

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Re: Understanding what numbers/abbreviations mean on war records
« Reply #2 on: Wednesday 31 March 21 10:30 BST (UK) »
Thank you for clarifying that. I found pictures of it on Ancestry.  Wasn't sure if A.C.I 470 meant something specific pertaining to whatever he had told them about his age?


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Re: Understanding what numbers/abbreviations mean on war records
« Reply #3 on: Wednesday 31 March 21 10:36 BST (UK) »
I would imagine all uniformed organisations have these abbreviations which mean nothing to the general public.

When I applied for my late father-in-law's army record they included a long list of what the abbreviations meant.
Ashford: Somerset, London
England: Devon, London, New Zealand
Holdway: Wiltshire
Hooper: Bristol, Somerset
Knowling: Devon, London
Southcott: Devon, China
Strong: Wiltshire
Watson: Cambridgeshire
White: Bristol
Windo - Gloucestershire, Somerset, Wiltshire

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Re: Understanding what numbers/abbreviations mean on war records
« Reply #4 on: Wednesday 31 March 21 10:40 BST (UK) »
I would imagine that the 470 on the ACI may well have referred to birth/age details.
Ashford: Somerset, London
England: Devon, London, New Zealand
Holdway: Wiltshire
Hooper: Bristol, Somerset
Knowling: Devon, London
Southcott: Devon, China
Strong: Wiltshire
Watson: Cambridgeshire
White: Bristol
Windo - Gloucestershire, Somerset, Wiltshire

Offline Nellieginn

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Re: Understanding what numbers/abbreviations mean on war records
« Reply #5 on: Wednesday 31 March 21 10:47 BST (UK) »
Sorry, going off the trail here, but when you say father-in-law.....does that mean WW2 records?  I only ask as I'm trying to find them about my Granduncle.
Cheers

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Re: Understanding what numbers/abbreviations mean on war records
« Reply #6 on: Wednesday 31 March 21 10:52 BST (UK) »
Yes that would have been WW2.  You can apply for records, cost 30 and will take some time to appear.

This shows how to apply

https://www.gov.uk/get-copy-military-service-records
Ashford: Somerset, London
England: Devon, London, New Zealand
Holdway: Wiltshire
Hooper: Bristol, Somerset
Knowling: Devon, London
Southcott: Devon, China
Strong: Wiltshire
Watson: Cambridgeshire
White: Bristol
Windo - Gloucestershire, Somerset, Wiltshire

Offline Nellieginn

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Re: Understanding what numbers/abbreviations mean on war records
« Reply #7 on: Wednesday 31 March 21 10:57 BST (UK) »
That's great...thank you...my Granduncle spent his whole school and working life in the military so it's been difficult to put together the records we have as they don't actually say where he went, how long he was there etc.  We believe he was attached to the ghurkas around 1942 for a little while, but I can't find anything to confirm this.  Was hoping getting his service records may shed some light on it all.
Cheers

Offline Crumblie

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Re: Understanding what numbers/abbreviations mean on war records
« Reply #8 on: Wednesday 31 March 21 13:02 BST (UK) »
Armed forces records were never intended to be read/understood by civilians, they were written by service personnel for service personnel. Despite serving for 24 years some of them still look like goobledygook to me.