Author Topic: How do deal with elusive ancestors (German Jewish)  (Read 105 times)

Offline Zrg

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How do deal with elusive ancestors (German Jewish)
« on: Thursday 08 April 21 01:01 BST (UK) »
I have a 3rd & 4th great grandfather who came to London in the early/mid 1800s, I've found more info on my 3rd GG than my 4th and I've found some death registers and found where they were buried (Stepney area) . I searched Deceased Online and found a document I can buy but will it give me much information such as where in Hamburg he was born? Ideally I'd like to find out more about their time in Germany. I've not found any passenger lists or anything that relates to their time in Germany. I've tried JewishGen but there isn't anything on there and found a marriage on Synagogue Scribes which was also on Ancestry. Apart from that I've only got bits and pieces that doesn't build too much of a picture.

Names are Vigidor (Victor) Lazarus And
Hyman Lazarus.

Online PaulineJ

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Re: How do deal with elusive ancestors (German Jewish)
« Reply #1 on: Thursday 08 April 21 10:58 BST (UK) »
Welcome,

Deceased online will tell you where & when buried, age and last known address, occasionally who organised the burial.

No parents/origins where the deceased was an adult. You sometimes see parents given for a child burial.

IF you want help, then we need dates, not just names. as it is, We've no idea.

eg  Hyman: is he the parent or the child?

Is this him in 1871? https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VRJQ-D6G

Pauline
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Offline JustinL

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Re: How do deal with elusive ancestors (German Jewish)
« Reply #2 on: Thursday 08 April 21 14:20 BST (UK) »
At some point during the 20 or so years that I have been researching my German-Jewish ancestry, I acquired the transcribed Jewish birth records of Hamburg for the period 1760 to 1865.

May 1826 Mendel son of Victor Lazarus (from Lissa) and Rieke Mendel (from Moritzfelde)
[Lissa is now Leszno, Moritzfelde is Morzyczyn; both in Poland]

Mar 1833 Heymann son of Victor Lazarus (from Lissa) and Rahel Rahles (from Hamburg)
[Victor and Rahel had married on 1 May 1832 in Hamburg. She may have been a daughter of Heymann Rahles.]

10 Nov 1834 Hanna dau. of Victor Lazarus (from Lissa) and Rahel Rahles (from Hamburg)

The original records are held in the State Archives of Hamburg.

The marriage record you found on SynagogueScribes (pinched by ancestry) is of use because it reveals the Hebrew name of Victor's father, i.e. Eliezer. Victor was born long before the Jews of Lissa had adopted fixed surnames. He would have been know by a patronymic name Victor Lezer. He obviously chose to adopt a biblical form of his father's given name as a fixed surname.

I have also found Victor in the following censuses:

1841 at 29 Old Compton Street, St. Anne’s, Soho: Victor, 35, cap maker, b. Foreign parts
1861 at  39 Gun Street, Old Artillery Ground: Victor, 60, cap maker, b. Poland, 3rd wife Rebecca, 45, b. Aldgate, daughter, Hannah, 23, b. Hamburg
1871  at 10 Emanuel Almshouse, Wapping: Victor, b. Germany, with 3rd wife, Rebecca, and daughter Anna, 25
1881 at 10 Emanuel Almshouse, Wapping: Victor, widow, 84, annuitant, b. Poland

His death was registered in Stepney in Q1 1886. I haven't managed to locate his place of burial in the numerous Jewish cemeteries of East London.