Author Topic: Family Heirlooms  (Read 4032 times)

Online Erato

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Re: Family Heirlooms
« Reply #18 on: Wednesday 26 May 21 20:29 BST (UK) »
I'm afraid I have no photos that show the settee.  It was not a delicately carved or graceful item but, rather, sturdy, serviceable and uncomfortably straight-lined.  As I recall, its only ornamentation were some carved knobs at the back of the arm rests.  Of course, the cushions must have been replaced many times; they were thin, flat and hard in my day.  I'm guessing that it was made of oak but it's been a long time since I saw it.  My father had it after my grandparents passed away and then, when he died a few years ago, it was passed on to a younger relative.  Here's the original owner, Nancy Davis Tarr b. 1789 in Lewiston, Maine, who got it as a wedding present:
Wiltshire:  Banks, Taylor
Somerset:  Duddridge, Richards, Barnard, Pillinger
Gloucestershire:  Barnard, Marsh, Crossman
Bristol:  Banks, Duddridge, Barnard
Down:  Ennis, McGee
Wicklow:  Chapman, Pepper
Wigtownshire:  Logan, Conning
Wisconsin:  Ennis, Chapman, Logan, Ware
Maine:  Ware, Mitchell, Tarr, Davis

Offline chiddicks

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Re: Family Heirlooms
« Reply #19 on: Wednesday 26 May 21 20:59 BST (UK) »
  I have my gr grandfather's sea chest, and a wool embroidery of a sailing ship done by him at some stage in his career. Also a sampler made by his future second wife in 1855 when she was aged 10.

The sea chest sounds really interesting, would love to see a picture if you have one
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Offline chiddicks

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Re: Family Heirlooms
« Reply #20 on: Wednesday 26 May 21 21:01 BST (UK) »
I'm afraid I have no photos that show the settee.  It was not a delicately carved or graceful item but, rather, sturdy, serviceable and uncomfortably straight-lined.  As I recall, its only ornamentation were some carved knobs at the back of the arm rests.  Of course, the cushions must have been replaced many times; they were thin, flat and hard in my day.  I'm guessing that it was made of oak but it's been a long time since I saw it.  My father had it after my grandparents passed away and then, when he died a few years ago, it was passed on to a younger relative.  Here's the original owner, Nancy Davis Tarr b. 1789 in Lewiston, Maine, who got it as a wedding present:

What a wonderful picture, you are so lucky to have a picture this old.

I love the way that your lasting memory of it was how uncomfortable it was!

I’ve always wanted a church pew in the hallway, one day maybe
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Searching the names Chiddicks, Keyes, Wootton, Daniels, Lake, Lukes, Day, Barnes


Online Erato

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Re: Family Heirlooms
« Reply #21 on: Wednesday 26 May 21 21:59 BST (UK) »
"how uncomfortable it was"

That's probably what saved its life.  During six generations, no one ever said, "I think I'll go curl up on the settee and get comfy with a good book."
Wiltshire:  Banks, Taylor
Somerset:  Duddridge, Richards, Barnard, Pillinger
Gloucestershire:  Barnard, Marsh, Crossman
Bristol:  Banks, Duddridge, Barnard
Down:  Ennis, McGee
Wicklow:  Chapman, Pepper
Wigtownshire:  Logan, Conning
Wisconsin:  Ennis, Chapman, Logan, Ware
Maine:  Ware, Mitchell, Tarr, Davis

Offline Viktoria

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Re: Family Heirlooms
« Reply #22 on: Wednesday 26 May 21 22:09 BST (UK) »
I am starting to feel sorry for the poor old settee,no one seems to have loved it !
A miracle it did not end up as firewood !
Aaaw!
Viktoria.

Offline chiddicks

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Re: Family Heirlooms
« Reply #23 on: Thursday 27 May 21 08:30 BST (UK) »
"how uncomfortable it was"

That's probably what saved its life.  During six generations, no one ever said, "I think I'll go curl up on the settee and get comfy with a good book."


Love that, it’s that uncomfortable it saved its life!
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Offline Brie

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Re: Family Heirlooms
« Reply #24 on: Thursday 27 May 21 08:53 BST (UK) »
I have my great-grandfather's wooden tool box from the 1850s. He was a carpenter and it would have been one of the first pieces he made as an apprentice. My Mum used it as a sewing box.

Which reminds me that I have loads of old wooden reels of cotton, buttons etc inherited from various relatives, including some Victorian needles so fine I can barely see them, let alone thread them. Did others of you "play" with button boxes as a child? Have to confess I can still waste time going through them.

Brie

Offline Viktoria

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Re: Family Heirlooms
« Reply #25 on: Thursday 27 May 21 09:36 BST (UK) »
Oh Mum’s button box, what a wonderful teaching aid,sorting by colour,shape,size,number of holes etc etc .
Mum could  tell a story of almost all the special ones ,”That  was on a coat I wore at ——“

I have a button box and never throw a garment away without removing buttons .Wartime economies being still practised!
Memories in a tin!
Viktoria.


Offline Brie

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Re: Family Heirlooms
« Reply #26 on: Thursday 27 May 21 09:44 BST (UK) »
Exactly Viktoria,

So many buttons have stories attached.

Also talking of sofas, I have my grandmother's sofa and have recently noticed that interior designers talk of "mid-century furniture" or as I know it - furniture what I grew up with. Makes me feel my age!

Brie