Author Topic: Family Heirlooms  (Read 4469 times)

Offline teragram31510

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Re: Family Heirlooms
« Reply #72 on: Monday 26 July 21 16:25 BST (UK) »
Here's a couple of photos of the book, the cover and a typical early page.

Margaret

Offline teragram31510

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Re: Family Heirlooms
« Reply #73 on: Monday 26 July 21 16:27 BST (UK) »
And here's a calculation for tiling a roof !

Offline Viktoria

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Re: Family Heirlooms
« Reply #74 on: Monday 26 July 21 19:20 BST (UK) »
Yes, we put the results at the top ,and the remainder is isolated by a line extreme right .
We could do the subtraction below then, so 4 into 6 = 1  carry the remainder 2 to the next digit ie 5,so then it is how many times does four go into 25, etc.
   

    ——————-
4/65943201

I can remember doing long and short  division before the 11+ exam, so we would be ten or so.
But it amazes me how hard work was for children years and years ago.
My sister in law gave my son (at Uni) his grandad’s Maths text and exercise books from Nightschool aged 14, he left school at that age in 1917.
Bright but no chance of going to Grammar School ,finances would not allow that.
My son was very impressed ,he had done Pure and Applied Maths at A Level
and what his Grandad had done was very advanced ,especially considering his age.
Thanks.
Viktoria.


Offline chiddicks

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Re: Family Heirlooms
« Reply #75 on: Monday 26 July 21 19:55 BST (UK) »
Those books and the entries are stunning terragram, you are so lucky to have such wonderful heirlooms, the writing looks wonderful. Thank you for sharing these on here I really appreciate it.
https://chiddicksfamilytree.com

Searching the names Chiddicks, Keyes, Wootton, Daniels, Lake, Lukes, Day, Barnes

Online Erato

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Re: Family Heirlooms
« Reply #76 on: Monday 26 July 21 20:03 BST (UK) »
Ah, yes, they were called 'guzintas' in the olden days.
Wiltshire:  Banks, Taylor
Somerset:  Duddridge, Richards, Barnard, Pillinger
Gloucestershire:  Barnard, Marsh, Crossman
Bristol:  Banks, Duddridge, Barnard
Down:  Ennis, McGee
Wicklow:  Chapman, Pepper
Wigtownshire:  Logan, Conning
Wisconsin:  Ennis, Chapman, Logan, Ware
Maine:  Ware, Mitchell, Tarr, Davis

Offline IgorStrav

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Re: Family Heirlooms
« Reply #77 on: Monday 26 July 21 21:17 BST (UK) »
I have two particular cherished heirlooms.

The first is a family bible, dated 1845.

The second is a gate leg table, which was bought in 1935 by my grandmother with 12s 6d left to her at her own mother's death - it was in thanks for her travelling weekly from Walthamstow to Greenwich to clean my great grandmother's rooms.

t's a small oak side table, with barley twist legs, one of which has been put in upside down so it turns the opposite way from the others.

This little table, now 86 years old, has just journeyed with me on my house move from Oxford to Sheffield (via a period in storage), and was immediately arranged in our new living room by my daughter.

The connection through from my great grandmother (born in 1851 in Rutland) through to my grandmother (born 1888 in Greenwich) to my father (born 1915 in Leyton) to me and now to my daughter.

 ;D



Pay, Kent. 
Barham, Kent. 
Cork(e), Kent. 
Cooley, Kent.
Barwell, Rutland/Northants/Greenwich.
Cotterill, Derbys.
Van Steenhoven/Steenhoven/Hoven, Nord Brabant/Belgium/East London.
Kesneer Belgium/East London
Burton, East London.
Barlow, East London
Wayling, East London
Wade, Greenwich/Brightlingsea, Essex.
Thorpe, Brightlingsea, Essex

Offline chiddicks

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Re: Family Heirlooms
« Reply #78 on: Monday 26 July 21 21:20 BST (UK) »
I have two particular cherished heirlooms.

The first is a family bible, dated 1845.

The second is a gate leg table, which was bought in 1935 by my grandmother with 12s 6d left to her at her own mother's death - it was in thanks for her travelling weekly from Walthamstow to Greenwich to clean my great grandmother's rooms.

t's a small oak side table, with barley twist legs, one of which has been put in upside down so it turns the opposite way from the others.

This little table, now 86 years old, has just journeyed with me on my house move from Oxford to Sheffield (via a period in storage), and was immediately arranged in our new living room by my daughter.

The connection through from my great grandmother (born in 1851 in Rutland) through to my grandmother (born 1888 in Greenwich) to my father (born 1915 in Leyton) to me and now to my daughter.

 ;D



Great story Igor and what a priceless family heirloom and piece of furniture and how wonderful that it connects so many generations of your family together.
https://chiddicksfamilytree.com

Searching the names Chiddicks, Keyes, Wootton, Daniels, Lake, Lukes, Day, Barnes

Offline Viktoria

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Re: Family Heirlooms
« Reply #79 on: Monday 26 July 21 21:34 BST (UK) »
 ;D ;D ;D
4 guzinta 8 two times.
Well it did when I was at Junior school in the 1940’s .
But things change!
Viktoria.

Offline Viktoria

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Re: Family Heirlooms
« Reply #80 on: Tuesday 27 July 21 00:27 BST (UK) »
It is not actually in my possession now, but in store awaiting someone to give it a good home .
A very inexpensive at the time ,1896,bedroom suite which was my paternal grandparents’ ,bought 1896 when they married.
It would have been inexpensive for they were of very modest means .

I say inexpensive but very well made .
Was a maroon varnish trying to look like mahogany ,but it came to me from my father’s sister when she died ,she lived with their father and her and my father’s brother,after she married.
It survived the fire from an incendiary bomb which dropped down the chimney on the night of December 23 rd 1940 when Manchester was very badly bombed.
Grandad was dropped into the cellar still in his armchair as he refused to go to the communal shelter - well Hitler was not getting him into any air raid shelter,no but grandad was in hospital for three or more months, with extensive burns.
It came to me when Auntie died and I had it stripped to reveal fairly dark wood ,but hand waxed it was lovely .
I gave it to my grandson when I downsized ,they have a very modern house with lots of built in furniture he has done  himself ,so it is in store and I told them to sell it or chalk paint it then sell it .
So at 125 years old it is still going strong if not in use at the moment ,however a new baby in November ,so it may be useful again.
It looked lovely in my Victorian house.
But a bit silly in my modern one.
Viktoria.