Author Topic: London Neighbourhoods  (Read 1646 times)

Offline Lily M

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Re: London Neighbourhoods
« Reply #27 on: Sunday 08 August 21 15:39 BST (UK) »
Thank you 🙂    Good luck with looking for that one.

Offline hanes teulu

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Re: London Neighbourhoods
« Reply #28 on: Sunday 08 August 21 16:17 BST (UK) »
Spotted a possible candidate.
A William John Ward married a Sarah Gardner at St. Bartholomew the Great, City of London, 22 Oct 1828 (witnesses don't help). The location is very close to Norton Folgate.
Not going to pursue further!
S. Wales, Somerset, Devon - Oxenham

Aberavon - Hopkin/s, Jenkins, Thomas
St. Brides/Wick - Jenkins
Llanblethian -† Price
Abergwynfi -† Han(d)ford
Pontardawe -† Lewis.

Offline davisd

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Re: London Neighbourhoods
« Reply #29 on: Sunday 08 August 21 18:08 BST (UK) »
From what you have said I agree that wealthy Marylebone William is not yours. Have you tried tracing William through the censuses and possibly marriages etc to confirm that you are correct? Eliminating the wrong ones can often be as useful as finding the right ones.

Have you located all of his convict records at Ďthe other endí? Do you have his Australian marriage and death certificates which may, depending on time and place (and knowledge of informant on d/c), give his parents names?
I have checked all the Australian records normally available including his "permission to marry" but have not seen the wedding record itself. I'm not sure that Australian records of 1837 would necessarily have included parents' names - I know English records didn't need to be listed. That would of course simplify everything!

The birth and baptism are available on "English Select Births and Christenings 1538-1875" at St Mary Marylebone.

Offline davisd

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Re: London Neighbourhoods
« Reply #30 on: Wednesday 11 August 21 22:31 BST (UK) »
Manchester Square, the location of the theft, is in Marylebone.  But perhaps you already know that, which is why youíre looking at that area.

While I'm still working on the same lines, I have a question about another neighbourhood these folks lived in - Old Bailey. Here on a burial notice is a notation Old Bailey in Bay. I note other are listed as Workhouse in Chick (Chicks Lane) and Cow Lane in Bay but I can't quite work out the "in Bay" bit - assuming it's a street location or something. Anyone have ideas?


Offline Lily M

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Re: London Neighbourhoods
« Reply #31 on: Thursday 12 August 21 04:02 BST (UK) »
Chick and Bay arenít neighbourhoods.  My guess would be that they refer to the specific areas in the churchyard where the burials took place.

Offline davisd

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Re: London Neighbourhoods
« Reply #32 on: Thursday 12 August 21 13:21 BST (UK) »
Chick and Bay arenít neighbourhoods.  My guess would be that they refer to the specific areas in the churchyard where the burials took place.
Chick refers, I thought to the Workhouse in Chick Lane. I can't quite understand Bay in the same context. Perhaps there was a Chick Lane portion of the cemetery?

Offline Lily M

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Re: London Neighbourhoods
« Reply #33 on: Thursday 12 August 21 13:44 BST (UK) »
Iíve just found this.

'St Sepulchre had a large population, and a high death rate, so like most city churches had difficulties with finding burial places. The space immediately around many churches, including St Sep. was crowded in with development, and noticeably higher than the church where it was still open ground, due to the number of burials. The church authorities established a separate burial ground in Chick Lane, and the majority of burials from the mid-18th century took place there, thus 'Chick' or 'The Chick'. Some burials (generally though there is no totally consistent pattern) the better off were buried in the Bay, ground which was still available adjacent to the church. The really well-off (or church officials like parish clerks, beadles etc) might be buried in the church itself, thus occasional entries such as 'buried in the left ile' - ile is what is now spelled aisle.'

Offline davisd

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Re: London Neighbourhoods
« Reply #34 on: Thursday 12 August 21 14:04 BST (UK) »
Iíve just found this.

'St Sepulchre had a large population, and a high death rate, so like most city churches had difficulties with finding burial places. The space immediately around many churches, including St Sep. was crowded in with development, and noticeably higher than the church where it was still open ground, due to the number of burials. The church authorities established a separate burial ground in Chick Lane, and the majority of burials from the mid-18th century took place there, thus 'Chick' or 'The Chick'. Some burials (generally though there is no totally consistent pattern) the better off were buried in the Bay, ground which was still available adjacent to the church. The really well-off (or church officials like parish clerks, beadles etc) might be buried in the church itself, thus occasional entries such as 'buried in the left ile' - ile is what is now spelled aisle.'
I've been searching for this kind of information - many thanks - that's most helpful!

Offline davisd

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Re: London Neighbourhoods
« Reply #35 on: Thursday 12 August 21 18:36 BST (UK) »
Iíve just found this.

'St Sepulchre had a large population, and a high death rate, so like most city churches had difficulties with finding burial places. The space immediately around many churches, including St Sep. was crowded in with development, and noticeably higher than the church where it was still open ground, due to the number of burials. The church authorities established a separate burial ground in Chick Lane, and the majority of burials from the mid-18th century took place there, thus 'Chick' or 'The Chick'. Some burials (generally though there is no totally consistent pattern) the better off were buried in the Bay, ground which was still available adjacent to the church. The really well-off (or church officials like parish clerks, beadles etc) might be buried in the church itself, thus occasional entries such as 'buried in the left ile' - ile is what is now spelled aisle.'

Is it possible that people who sere not of the parish could be buried there?