Author Topic: What does "?vix" mean on a marriage entry dated 1707  (Read 1129 times)

Offline chrisos

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What does "?vix" mean on a marriage entry dated 1707
« on: Monday 09 August 21 07:01 BST (UK) »
Hi
Would someone be able to provide a possible translation of what appears to be "?vix" on the second line of the attached.  It refers to a marriage in Nov 1707 at St Cuthberts, Edinburgh.  I would like to know what connection Agnes Daes was to Sir Patrick Nisbet - relative?? servant?? etc.
Many thanks
Chris

Offline Kay99

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Re: What does "?vix" mean on a marriage entry dated 1707
« Reply #1 on: Monday 09 August 21 07:32 BST (UK) »
Could it be meant to be duxit meaning married ??   :-\  https://www.genuki.org.uk/big/LatinNotes

Kay

Offline GR2

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Re: What does "?vix" mean on a marriage entry dated 1707
« Reply #2 on: Monday 09 August 21 08:49 BST (UK) »
It is her relationship to Sir Patrick. I would have to study the first part of the line more closely, but it ends in "-trix" and could be something like "servatrix", the feminine form of "servator" meaning "servant".


Offline Watson

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Re: What does "?vix" mean on a marriage entry dated 1707
« Reply #3 on: Monday 09 August 21 10:24 BST (UK) »
All I can suggest is that it may be an abbreviated form of Nutrix, which, in Latin, can mean a nurse, and also, I think, a foster-mother.  However, I am puzzled because the rest of the entry is not in Latin.

Offline GR2

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Re: What does "?vix" mean on a marriage entry dated 1707
« Reply #4 on: Monday 09 August 21 11:23 BST (UK) »
I am puzzled because the rest of the entry is not in Latin.

Servatrix and nutrix are regularly used like this in Scots where they are treated as ordinary Scots words. As we use chauffeur or chef.

Offline horselydown86

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Re: What does "?vix" mean on a marriage entry dated 1707
« Reply #5 on: Monday 09 August 21 16:21 BST (UK) »
I would have to study the first part of the line more closely, but it ends in "-trix"...

As GR2 has suggested, we need to to see the first part of this line properly.  The beginning of the word in question extends well below the line and is truncated by the clip.

Please make a larger clip showing at least three lines distance below the extent of this one.

Offline chrisos

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Re: What does "?vix" mean on a marriage entry dated 1707
« Reply #6 on: Tuesday 10 August 21 02:51 BST (UK) »
Hi all
Sorry for time delay but am in Australia.  Have attached an extended copy of the clip.  Unfortunately the entry is near the bottom of the page and not much more can be shown of the page.  To confuse matters further, I have discovered that Sir Patrick Nisbet of Dean died in 1682, 25 years before the date of this marriage and there doesn't appear to have been another son named Patrick.  I believe Agnes was born approx 1680.  I really appreciate everyone' taking the time to help with this. 
Chris
Rural NSW

Offline horselydown86

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Re: What does "?vix" mean on a marriage entry dated 1707
« Reply #7 on: Tuesday 10 August 21 06:03 BST (UK) »
Thanks for posting the new image.  Unfortunately I can't make any progress from it.

Like GR2 I think the word ends with -trix.  A search in the DSL shows there are dozens of words which end this way - many of them potentially very interesting:

https://dsl.ac.uk/results/%2Atrix/fulltext/withquotes/both/

At the beginning of our problem word you can see a line which angles down to the left followed by another line which curves to the right and then downwards.  To have any chance of working it out, we need to see the full extent of those lines.

ADDED:

Among the -trix words are some for which Sir Patrick doesn't have to still be alive.

Offline Mike in Cumbria

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Re: What does "?vix" mean on a marriage entry dated 1707
« Reply #8 on: Tuesday 10 August 21 07:10 BST (UK) »
Heritrix/heretrix would make sense, given the context.
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