Author Topic: McLorinan family burying-ground, Antrim  (Read 791 times)

Offline Elwyn Soutter

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Re: McLorinan family burying-ground, Antrim
« Reply #36 on: Sunday 03 October 21 16:45 BST (UK) »
Hello, Elwyn.

My contact in the cemeteries department says they have no records about burials there. So it would be great if you would have a look.

As I said, Mackey graves would also be interesting. Another topic I started here, Mackey family of Antrim, has drawn a response from someone looking to place five Mackey siblings born in the 1810s and 1820s, and their father, evidently from Antrim, in the family from which Mary, Martha, and Rev. Alexander come; you might want to look at that.

I am away in Scotland at present but if you leave that with me, Iíll try and get in in the next week or so. I'll keep an eye out for any Mackey graves too.
Elwyn

Offline jnomad

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Re: McLorinan family burying-ground, Antrim
« Reply #37 on: Thursday 14 October 21 16:46 BST (UK) »
Another likely burial in the McLorinan family burying-ground, wherever that was: Eleanor Charters McLorinan, who died, a spinster, 19 November 1870, at the home of her father Henry McLorinan on Bow Lane (which was later called Castle Street; Henry died there in 1875). BNL death notice (21 November 1870) says she was his sixth daughter; I'm missing two. (Besides Eleanor, I have Elizabeth, who married John McDowell and was buried with him in the Friends' graveyard Moylinny; Martha, who died a spinster at Holywood in 1895; and Mary, see below.)

One of the daughters, Mary Simpson, who died in Stoneyford 28 September 1879, was to be taken to be buried in Antrim Churchyard (BNL death notice 30 September 1879). Does that mean the churchyard of the C of I church? That's where she was married. Perhaps that's another possibility for the family burying-ground.

One more thing: was/is there a Methodist graveyard?

Offline Elwyn Soutter

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Re: McLorinan family burying-ground, Antrim
« Reply #38 on: Yesterday at 23:08 »
Another likely burial in the McLorinan family burying-ground, wherever that was: Eleanor Charters McLorinan, who died, a spinster, 19 November 1870, at the home of her father Henry McLorinan on Bow Lane (which was later called Castle Street; Henry died there in 1875). BNL death notice (21 November 1870) says she was his sixth daughter; I'm missing two. (Besides Eleanor, I have Elizabeth, who married John McDowell and was buried with him in the Friends' graveyard Moylinny; Martha, who died a spinster at Holywood in 1895; and Mary, see below.)

One of the daughters, Mary Simpson, who died in Stoneyford 28 September 1879, was to be taken to be buried in Antrim Churchyard (BNL death notice 30 September 1879). Does that mean the churchyard of the C of I church? That's where she was married. Perhaps that's another possibility for the family burying-ground.

One more thing: was/is there a Methodist graveyard?

I don't know what was meant by Antrim churchyard. There is a small churchyard beside the COI church  but it probably only has 30 gravestones. It cannot have been the main graveyard for the area.

There was no graveyard attached to Antrim Methodist church (long closed now). Some Methodist churches did have graveyards but most used the COI or other public graveyards.
Elwyn


Offline jnomad

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Re: McLorinan family burying-ground, Antrim
« Reply #39 on: Today at 14:42 »
Thanks, Elwyn.

When you say Methodists used the COI or other public graveyards, that seems to imply that there was a dedicated COI graveyard somewhere? Just not, anyway for a new burial in 1879, in a place that could be described as a churchyard?

I'm wondering if the widower John Simpson, who put the notice of Mary's death in the BNL, was trying to express what he had arranged about the funeral with Mary's family (probably with her sister Martha, who seems to have taken over as head of household when their father died). Perhaps she meant the churchyard where the McLorinan graves were, and he (not being from Antrim himself) assumed that could be described as Antrim churchyard.

It still looks like a live possibility that there might be a patch of McLorinan graves, maybe including Mary Simpson, in the graveyard (churchyard) of the NSP/Unitarian church.