Author Topic: "Mail Driver" in 1911  (Read 174 times)

Offline Keith Sherwood

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"Mail Driver" in 1911
« on: Thursday 09 September 21 01:21 BST (UK) »
Hi, Everyone,
Was just wondering whether the term "Mail Driver" as George Frederick BUTCHER's occupation in the 1911 Census in Kingston Upon Thames, Surrrey would have involved a horse drawn vehicle,   Or would some kind of motorised van or lorry have been in use by then. 
Thanks in advance!
Keith

Offline Kay99

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Re: "Mail Driver" in 1911
« Reply #1 on: Thursday 09 September 21 05:13 BST (UK) »
The Twickham Museum site suggests that deliveries involving horse drawn vehicles were replaced in the main by motorised delivery vehicles from around the 1920s - if this helps https://www.twickenham-museum.org.uk/detail.php?aid=428&ctid=4&cid=45

Kay

Offline Keith Sherwood

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Re: "Mail Driver" in 1911
« Reply #2 on: Thursday 09 September 21 11:12 BST (UK) »
Kay
Thanks so much for that link, very interesting reading.  I think George Frederick had earlier on been a "horse man" so maybe this knowhow was a bonus when delivering the mail in those days. I wonder what kind of horses were involved ...
Keith


Offline JenB

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Re: "Mail Driver" in 1911
« Reply #3 on: Thursday 09 September 21 11:41 BST (UK) »
The Dictionary of Occupational Terms has

driver, mail; mail cart driver, mail van driver ; post cart driver
is employed by contractor to carry Royal Mail bags between railway stations and district or head post offices by means of horse-drawn vehicle; in rural areas, collects mail bags on a round from local post offices and conveys to railway station for conveyance by train.


http://doot.spub.co.uk/idx.php?letter=M
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Online BumbleB

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Re: "Mail Driver" in 1911
« Reply #4 on: Thursday 09 September 21 12:18 BST (UK) »
If you ask "Mr Google" for "horse drawn post office wagon UK" you will find a number of photographs. My initial thought is that the breed of horse would not necessarily be Shire, but a lighter-framed breed.

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Offline Keith Sherwood

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Re: "Mail Driver" in 1911
« Reply #5 on: Thursday 09 September 21 12:55 BST (UK) »
Well, that couldn't be more comprehensive and detailed, JenB.  Those descriptive words reminded me slightly of the part time Christmas Deliveries that I took part in as a schoolboy still in this very part of the world - Kingston/Surbiton - jumping on and off the back of a (motorised of course!) mail van as we collected mail sacks from local railway stations and delivered individual parcels later to household addresses. In the mid 1960's.
And Hi again, BumbleB - very nice to have a look at the variety of horse drawn vehicles used 110 years ago, too.  Same streets, different mode of transport...
Keith
...and I was really surprised to see that photo of the last horse drawn mail vehicle in London as late as 1949.  I can vaguely remember the horse drawn brewery drays coming out of the Stag Brewery in Victoria, London when I used to spend Chistmases practically opposite there with my grandparents as a very small boy.  But hadn't realised that the Royal Mail was still then being collected and delivered in this way.