Author Topic: Unusual Occupation?  (Read 1101 times)

Offline Ray T

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,244
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Unusual Occupation?
« Reply #9 on: Thursday 16 September 21 16:14 BST (UK) »
In 1901 she was  a General Servant (domestic)  -  3351/16/23

I'm sure that there were dressmakers who made dresses and those who didn't!

I assume that's her in 1901 - still showing as married, rather than widowed in 1911. It's really her husband George I'm trying to track down. He was born Shropshire c.1876 - never registered - and they married in Congleton in 1895. Where was he in 1901? I think he may have there died in 1903 - the info I have is all very sketchy. I can't even be sure I have the right Ann - this one was was around 19 years older than George

Offline Viktoria

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 3,267
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Unusual Occupation?
« Reply #10 on: Thursday 16 September 21 17:20 BST (UK) »
I digress- on a 1950’s / 60’s show,  A sagger maker’s bottom knocker ——it was something like “ Guess my line”, unusual occupations.
That one was to do with the potteries ,a sagger being something to do with unfired pots,and a frame they were transported on to the kilns.
Any clarification welcome.
Viktoria.

Offline Ray T

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,244
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Unusual Occupation?
« Reply #11 on: Thursday 16 September 21 22:56 BST (UK) »
I digress- on a 1950’s / 60’s show,  A sagger maker’s bottom knocker ——it was something like “ Guess my line”, unusual occupations.
That one was to do with the potteries ,a sagger being something to do with unfired pots,and a frame they were transported on to the kilns.
Any clarification welcome.
Viktoria.

http://www.thepotteries.org/bottle_kiln/saggar.htm

My grandfather was a “planker”.


Offline Viktoria

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 3,267
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Unusual Occupation?
« Reply #12 on: Thursday 16 September 21 23:25 BST (UK) »
Thanks for the info, I remember the hilarity in the programme.

Now a planker,I don’t want to cast aspidistras so will look it up ,but I hope you don’t mean one of them there things like wot Del Boy called Rodders- ie a Plonker!

Viktoria,

Offline Ray T

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,244
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Unusual Occupation?
« Reply #13 on: Friday 17 September 21 13:09 BST (UK) »
It’s one of the many processes in felt hat manufacturing and involves rolling freshly made wet felt between blankets in order to shrink it. The factory had a machine to do it but never used it.

Offline andrewalston

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 2,576
  • My granddad
    • View Profile
Re: Unusual Occupation?
« Reply #14 on: Friday 17 September 21 16:52 BST (UK) »
Of course "Dressmaker" was not always a euphemism for the actual occupation. Sometimes it was real and sometimes that occupation was spelled out in clear, as in the 1861 entry for Elizabeth Kennedy, an 18-year old from Stockport, who was living in Back Piccadilly, Manchester (RG9/2948 folio 88 page 31. Her actual trade and that of her neighbours, is there in the census sheets.

How did the enumerator know?
Looking at ALSTON in south Ribble area, ALSTEAD and DONBAVAND/DUNBABIN etc. everywhere, HOWCROFT and MARSH in Bolton and Westhoughton, PICKERING in the Whitehaven area.

Census information is Crown Copyright. See www.nationalarchives.gov.uk for details.

Online BumbleB

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 12,382
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Unusual Occupation?
« Reply #15 on: Friday 17 September 21 16:59 BST (UK) »
Well, he must have done the rounds as there are a number of addresses in the area where females are attributed with an additional profession  ::)
Transcriptions and NBI are merely finding aids.  They are NOT a substitute for original record entries.
Remember - "They'll be found when they want to be found" !!!
If you don't ask the question, you won't get an answer.
He/she who never made a mistake, never made anything.
Archbell - anywhere, any date
Kendall - WRY
Milner - WRY
Appleyard - WRY

Offline Ray T

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,244
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Unusual Occupation?
« Reply #16 on: Friday 17 September 21 17:02 BST (UK) »
There were 4 of them at that address and another 3 two doors away. Other pages have other "euphomisms".

Offline Viktoria

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 3,267
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Unusual Occupation?
« Reply #17 on: Friday 17 September 21 18:05 BST (UK) »
Sanitary Engineer——emptied the “ Dolley Vardens” .
Loos, lavies , W,Cs, only there was no water.
Seemingly because part of these  “ conveniences” resembled a bonnet as worn at the time of Dickens and Dolly was a character of his.
Help—-  “ The Old Curiosity Shop”.?
Viktoria.
Just looked it up,—“ Barnaby Rudge “ and it was “ the night soil cart ,” with its distinctive lid which was nick named The Dolly Varden.
The cart emptied the none flushing toilets.
V.