Author Topic: Yeoman Farmers - Do They Own Land?  (Read 1443 times)

Offline melba_schmelba

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Re: Yeoman Farmers - Do They Own Land?
« Reply #18 on: Friday 29 October 21 12:33 BST (UK) »
The same Will/Inventory process continued til 1858 and then the Government took over from the Religious bodies. Executors to this day have to make an inventory, usually aided by a solicitor, and submit the final valuation to the GRO/IR so it can be taxed.

I don't think the GRO takes copies of inventories and they are kept by the executors/solicitors themselves, although I might be wrong...
The latest inventories that I am aware of seeing are in the late 18th century, maybe 1770s. I don't think I've ever seen an inventory later than that, and I've seen lots of wills in different local courts.

Offline Maiden Stone

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Re: Yeoman Farmers - Do They Own Land?
« Reply #19 on: Friday 29 October 21 13:34 BST (UK) »

The latest inventories that I am aware of seeing are in the late 18th century, maybe 1770s. I don't think I've ever seen an inventory later than that, and I've seen lots of wills in different local courts.

The latest inventory I've seen for my ancestors was 1767. It was for one of the innkeepers. It included many chairs and beds + animals.   
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Offline melba_schmelba

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Re: Yeoman Farmers - Do They Own Land?
« Reply #20 on: Friday 29 October 21 14:28 BST (UK) »

The latest inventories that I am aware of seeing are in the late 18th century, maybe 1770s. I don't think I've ever seen an inventory later than that, and I've seen lots of wills in different local courts.

The latest inventory I've seen for my ancestors was 1767. It was for one of the innkeepers. It included many chairs and beds + animals.
I wonder if there was some Act of Parliament which explains it? Maybe the inventories had to be made, but simply not archived or copied after that era?

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Offline melba_schmelba

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Re: Yeoman Farmers - Do They Own Land?
« Reply #22 on: Friday 29 October 21 17:14 BST (UK) »
https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/821770/C3_2006_.pdf
Thanks youngtug. I am pretty sure that with all post 1858 wills I have ordered copies of, there was never an inventory included. So maybe the law changed some time in the late 18th century, as regarding mandating the keeping originals or copies of those inventories by all the different courts.

Offline Maiden Stone

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Re: Yeoman Farmers - Do They Own Land?
« Reply #23 on: Friday 29 October 21 17:38 BST (UK) »

I wonder if there was some Act of Parliament which explains it? Maybe the inventories had to be made, but simply not archived or copied after that era?

Legally required England & Wales 1529-1782. Optional after 1782. Not kept in will archives after 1858.
Source: "Researching Historic Buildings in the British Isles"
https://www.buildinghistory.org/wills.shtml
A reading list is at end of article.

The last of my line of yeoman who styled himself "yeoman" died 1822. I was disappointed his will wasn't accompanied by an inventory. His main beneficiary was his only child, a daughter. Her husband was exalted from gamekeeper, employed by the lord of the manor, to "gentleman" on the next record after his father-in-law's death.
Compilers of the inventory of the innkeeper who died 1767 valued his mare + some "husbandry goods" at 2-17 shillings. A cow, heifer and calf were worth 12. Sow (it may be sows) and "pigges"  were worth more than the horse, although number of "pigges" wasn't stated. I've wondered if the mare was under-valued. The innkeeper was Catholic and Catholics weren't allowed to own a horse worth more than 5. Valuations were done by the schoolmaster, whose wife was R.C. and a man whose family was R.C. On the other hand, perhaps it was an old horse or in poor condition. The younger, unmarried daughter was to have her choice of cow or heifer + first choice of best beds + specified items of furniture. She had her pick of a dozen beds. There was enough seating for 30 people, mostly in the "great parlour" which was probably the main public room. 2 of the 3 executors  of the will were yeoman, one of them the yeoman farmer relative. There were 2 spellings of the surname in the will.
Inventory of previous innkeeper in the family (1752) stated total value of his 3 horses was 6-14 shillings, so average value of a horse was around 2. His 4 head of cattle (2 cows, a stirk and a calf) were worth 9. "A Swine" was worth 1. Compilers of that inventory counted 50 chairs!  An executor was the schoolmaster.   

 
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Offline melba_schmelba

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Re: Yeoman Farmers - Do They Own Land?
« Reply #24 on: Friday 29 October 21 18:54 BST (UK) »

I wonder if there was some Act of Parliament which explains it? Maybe the inventories had to be made, but simply not archived or copied after that era?

Legally required England & Wales 1529-1782. Optional after 1782. Not kept in will archives after 1858.
Source: "Researching Historic Buildings in the British Isles"
https://www.buildinghistory.org/wills.shtml
A reading list is at end of article.
Thanks Maiden, that definitely ties in with what we have observed then :).

The last of my line of yeoman who styled himself "yeoman" died 1822. I was disappointed his will wasn't accompanied by an inventory. His main beneficiary was his only child, a daughter. Her husband was exalted from gamekeeper, employed by the lord of the manor, to "gentleman" on the next record after his father-in-law's death.
Compilers of the inventory of the innkeeper who died 1767 valued his mare + some "husbandry goods" at 2-17 shillings. A cow, heifer and calf were worth 12. Sow (it may be sows) and "pigges"  were worth more than the horse, although number of "pigges" wasn't stated. I've wondered if the mare was under-valued. The innkeeper was Catholic and Catholics weren't allowed to own a horse worth more than 5. Valuations were done by the schoolmaster, whose wife was R.C. and a man whose family was R.C. On the other hand, perhaps it was an old horse or in poor condition. The younger, unmarried daughter was to have her choice of cow or heifer + first choice of best beds + specified items of furniture. She had her pick of a dozen beds. There was enough seating for 30 people, mostly in the "great parlour" which was probably the main public room. 2 of the 3 executors  of the will were yeoman, one of them the yeoman farmer relative. There were 2 spellings of the surname in the will.
Inventory of previous innkeeper in the family (1752) stated total value of his 3 horses was 6-14 shillings, so average value of a horse was around 2. His 4 head of cattle (2 cows, a stirk and a calf) were worth 9. "A Swine" was worth 1. Compilers of that inventory counted 50 chairs!  An executor was the schoolmaster.   
Thanks for those details Maiden, fascinating. I had no idea a Catholic had not been able to own a horse worth more than 5!! Presumably that law was abolished with the repealing of the Popery Acts in the 1780s & 90s? I always think it is slightly amusing how certain people get given the 'second best bed' and wonder if they were offended! It certainly sounds like a substantial yeoman's residence with seating for 30 people in the great parlour.
  I think the term yeoman was still in use into the 20th century, there are people on the 1911 census still referred to as such, but farmer seems more common by then.