Author Topic: Ten pound Poms 1970's  (Read 352 times)

Offline Black Sheep

  • RootsChat Senior
  • ****
  • Posts: 332
    • View Profile
Ten pound Poms 1970's
« on: Monday 20 September 21 20:52 BST (UK) »
Hello,

When migrating to Australia in the 1960's what documentation did you have to provide ?

I have a short birth certificate myself, but could you emigrate to Australia during this time period without a full certificate ?

BS

Offline mckha489

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 6,647
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Ten pound Poms 1970's
« Reply #1 on: Monday 20 September 21 21:15 BST (UK) »
I came to NZ as a baby named on my mother’s passport.

I would have thought the full birth certificate would be required to add a child to a parent’s passport, but perhaps it wasn’t.  My mother’s passport looks as though you could just write in the names yourself if you wanted!
Side tracked to a friend’s very interesting Norfolk families. MORGAN, PRATT, HORNOR, SUCKLING, GLEANE etc. And in London DOWNES, du CROZ, MORGAN (same MORGANs as the Norwich lot)

Offline Black Sheep

  • RootsChat Senior
  • ****
  • Posts: 332
    • View Profile
Re: Ten pound Poms 1970's
« Reply #2 on: Monday 20 September 21 21:30 BST (UK) »
Hi mckha489, I guess that your mum must have had a birth certificate for you as well.

They travelled as a family, husband, wife and children. It is the Husband that interests me, he would have had his marriage certificate and those of the children but just wondered if he could have got to Australia only having a short certificate of his own from the 1930's ???

BS


Offline Dundee

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 6,614
  • Census information Crown Copyright, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
    • View Profile
Re: Ten pound Poms 1970's
« Reply #3 on: Monday 20 September 21 23:14 BST (UK) »
People travelling to Australia under the assisted passage scheme did not need passports and were issued identity documents requiring a photograph only.  If you held a passport it had to be surrendered.  There is nothing in the application forms about producing marriage or birth documents.  They were far more interested in vaccination, chest xrays, contagious diseases and employment history.  Nothing has changed much.

Debra  :)

Offline Neale1961

  • RootsChat Aristocrat
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,589
    • View Profile
Re: Ten pound Poms 1970's
« Reply #4 on: Tuesday 21 September 21 02:20 BST (UK) »
You may well find the immigration records either in Australian National Archives or in your State Archives.
I found relatives’ immigration records for the 1950s in both of these locations.
Milligan - Jardine – Glencross – Dinwoodie - Brown: (Dumfriesshire & Kirkcudbrightshire)
Clark – Faulds – Cuthbertson – Bryson – Wilson: (Ayrshire & Renfrewshire)
Neale – Cater – Kinder - Harrison: (Warwickshire & Queensland)
Roberts - Spry: (Cornwall, Middlesex & Queensland)
Munster: (Schleswig-Holstein & Queensland) and Plate: (Braunschweig, Neubruck & Queensland)

Offline majm

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 24,435
  • NSW 1806 Bowman Flag Ecce signum.
    • View Profile
Re: Ten pound Poms 1970's
« Reply #5 on: Tuesday 21 September 21 02:46 BST (UK) »
The information in my posts is provided for academic and non-commercial research purposes. 
Random Acts of Kindness Given Freely are never Worthless for they are Priceless.
Qui scit et non docet.    Qui docet et non vivit.    Qui nescit et non interrogat.   
All Census Look Ups Are Crown Copyright from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
I do not have a face book or a twitter account.

Offline Black Sheep

  • RootsChat Senior
  • ****
  • Posts: 332
    • View Profile
Re: Ten pound Poms 1970's
« Reply #6 on: Tuesday 21 September 21 17:15 BST (UK) »
How very surprising Debra, you would have thought that a birth/marriage certificate would be a basic requirement interesting to know what was important then and what was not.

Neale1961 I following your advice and could see all the family travelling together.

Majm, loved to see the old poster, yes all the children were school age so all went free.

Thank you very much.

BS

Offline judb

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 6,701
    • View Profile
Re: Ten pound Poms 1970's
« Reply #7 on: Wednesday 22 September 21 06:49 BST (UK) »
You may be interested in seeing the kinds of documents used in the scheme:

This one is a  half-completed application form for the scheme - from a Victorian museum.

https://collections.museumsvictoria.com.au/items/2097517

This one for a couple who hadn't provided full information and mentions the application for a Document of Identity
https://collections.museumsvictoria.com.au/items/2025615

Today there much more documentation and identity requirements than there was in the past.  I needed a new Australian passport in 1970 while I was living in the UK and my 'referee' was the local bank manager who didn't know me from Adam!
When my children were born there was no Medicare and you could just book into hospital using whatever name you chose as no documentation needed to be shown, nor was any shown by the informant for the birth certificate.
Even today, when giving information for a death certificate there is no requirement to show any documentaion so what goes on the certificate is whatever is said by the informant.

Judith



DYER - Wilts, London, Somerset, MIDLANE - Hants, Wilts, SONE - Hants, WRIGHT - London, Hants, SEAGER - Deptford, DWYER, FERGUSON - Victoria, MASON - Woodford Vic, BALLARD - South Wales, GOULDBY - Lowestoft
"Time present and time past are both perhaps present in time future..." T S Eliot

UK Census information Crown Copyrightt, from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

Offline majm

  • RootsChat Marquessate
  • *******
  • Posts: 24,435
  • NSW 1806 Bowman Flag Ecce signum.
    • View Profile
Re: Ten pound Poms 1970's
« Reply #8 on: Wednesday 22 September 21 08:13 BST (UK) »
I was born NSW 1947.  No requirement for anyone to 'prove' that birth,  my father just went along to the Court House and told them I had been born.  The clerks there believed him, afterall, he was a 'Public Servant' and his brother was a local clergyman.
 
When getting my NSW drivers licence I was not required to produce any ID to apply for a Learners Permit,  afterall I was 'known to staff', so they 'knew' I would know my date of birth, my name, my address etc, plus the chap in charge at the local Motor Registry Office was my mother's brother. 

The late Christopher Skase showed our government administrative paperwork flaws, and that was not until the late 1980s ... until then, officialdom actually accepted that people told the truth about themselves ...  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_Skase

People coming from Britain were 'British', and so officialdom 'knew' they would be more truthful, more upright, more honest than even us locally born baby boomers, and so they would be excellent examples for us colonials to strive to keep up with the highest standards of the Ten Pound Poms.   That was rural NSW in the 1950s and 1960s...  Mr Menzies ruled. 

JM
The information in my posts is provided for academic and non-commercial research purposes. 
Random Acts of Kindness Given Freely are never Worthless for they are Priceless.
Qui scit et non docet.    Qui docet et non vivit.    Qui nescit et non interrogat.   
All Census Look Ups Are Crown Copyright from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
I do not have a face book or a twitter account.