Author Topic: Possibly a song's lyrics?  (Read 703 times)

Offline Bookbox

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Re: Possibly a song's lyrics?
« Reply #18 on: Thursday 30 September 21 15:52 BST (UK) »
Could it be pretty ringlets? Jet is very Victorian but I've never heard jetty in that context...although admittedly it does look more like a j or a g than a p.

I agree with Arthur – jetty, not 'pretty'. The letter r in this hand is distinctive and it is absent from this word.

Oxford English Dictionary
jetty, adj.1
Forms:  late Middle English gety, 1500s–1600s ietty, 1600s ieaty, 1600s jettie
 
1. Of the colour of jet; jet-black.

OED references, given from 1477/78 onwards, include ...
1735   J. SWIFT Receipt to Stella in Wks. II. 219   Your jetty Locks with Garlands crown'd.
1858   Harper's Mag. Apr. 658/2   These, with her jetty hair and eyes, enhanced the apparent fairness of her complexion.
1901   E. ARNOLD Voy. Ithobal 100   The black, curled hair, Clustered on shining brow and velvet nape In such wise that no diadem was lacked To grace its jetty glory.
1925   J. DOS PASSOS Manhattan Transfer II. iv. 206   An ivoryskinned young woman with heavy sullen eyes and jetty hair came into the room.

Online PurdeyB

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Re: Possibly a song's lyrics?
« Reply #19 on: Thursday 30 September 21 16:04 BST (UK) »
Could it be pretty ringlets? Jet is very Victorian but I've never heard jetty in that context...although admittedly it does look more like a j or a g than a p.

I agree with Arthur – jetty, not 'pretty'. The letter r in this hand is distinctive and it is absent from this word.

Oxford English Dictionary
jetty, adj.1
Forms:  late Middle English gety, 1500s–1600s ietty, 1600s ieaty, 1600s jettie
 
1. Of the colour of jet; jet-black.

OED references, given from 1477/78 onwards, include ...
1735   J. SWIFT Receipt to Stella in Wks. II. 219   Your jetty Locks with Garlands crown'd.
1858   Harper's Mag. Apr. 658/2   These, with her jetty hair and eyes, enhanced the apparent fairness of her complexion.
1901   E. ARNOLD Voy. Ithobal 100   The black, curled hair, Clustered on shining brow and velvet nape In such wise that no diadem was lacked To grace its jetty glory.
1925   J. DOS PASSOS Manhattan Transfer II. iv. 206   An ivoryskinned young woman with heavy sullen eyes and jetty hair came into the room.

That's interesting, thanks for sharing. Fascinating how language changes over time, especially when something that just doesn't sound 'right' has an extensive pedigree!
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Offline Peter L. Mitchell

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Re: Possibly a song's lyrics?
« Reply #20 on: Thursday 30 September 21 23:20 BST (UK) »
That's great, folks.

The next line is: "The peach apple of thy cheek."

These are the final lines if anyone is keen to have a go. The writing is very difficult for me to work out.

Thanks,
            Peter


Online Wiggy

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Re: Possibly a song's lyrics?
« Reply #21 on: Friday 01 October 21 00:55 BST (UK) »
Do you think he wrote it himself - or found a poem he liked? 

The sentiments are definitely Victorian aren't they!   :D

It is tricky writing . . . . . . .    ;)
Gaunt, Ransom, McNally, Stanfield, Kimberley. (Tasmania)
Brown, Johnstone, Eskdale, Brand  (Dumfriesshire,  Scotland)
Booth, Bruerton, Deakin, Wilkes, Kimberley
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Percy, Dunning, Hyne, Grigg, Farley (Devon, UK)
Duncan (Fife, Devon), Hugh, Blee (Cornwall)
Green, Mansfield, (Herts)
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Offline Bookbox

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Re: Possibly a song's lyrics?
« Reply #22 on: Friday 01 October 21 01:00 BST (UK) »
I think he wrote it himself.

Here's a stab at the last four of those lines, but I'm stuck on some elements of the first two.

Here! a father’s kiss is thine
Infant daughter, Emeline!
Sweeter kiss, but never truer,
Shalt thou e’er receive from wooer!


Offline Peter L. Mitchell

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Re: Possibly a song's lyrics?
« Reply #23 on: Friday 01 October 21 01:13 BST (UK) »
That's terrific, Boobox!

The two lines above these end (respectively) in ". . . long trips" and ". . . of thy lips".

I think Wiggy might be on the right track in saying he might have written it himself. The daughter's name was Elizabeth, and "Emaline" could well have been a pet name - perhaps when she was younger she mis-pronounced her name and the family adopted it?

I have my doubts that her father wrote the poem in the book because all the other poems (there are over 100) in the book up to 1879, when it was given to her niece, are written in the same hand. Perhaps he wrote it down for her and she transcribed it into the book? So many questions! I do have to say that the writing for a 12 year-old is just amazing!

Thanks again for your help.

Peter

Offline Peter L. Mitchell

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Re: Possibly a song's lyrics?
« Reply #24 on: Friday 01 October 21 01:44 BST (UK) »
I think the two lines above are something like:

"And thy (long?) (blue?) (honey?) ________,
From the smile rise of thy lips!"

The first line definitely doesn't end in trips.

Peter

Online PurdeyB

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Re: Possibly a song's lyrics?
« Reply #25 on: Friday 01 October 21 06:55 BST (UK) »
I think the two lines above are something like:

"And thy (long?) (blue?) (honey?) ________,
From the smile rise of thy lips!"

The first line definitely doesn't end in trips.

Peter

I can't make sense of that first line but does it start 'And let'. The end looks like 'being myself' or 'being herself'
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Offline Bookbox

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Re: Possibly a song's lyrics?
« Reply #26 on: Friday 01 October 21 09:07 BST (UK) »
The first 2 lines ...

And let Hybla honey drip
From the Smile hive of thy Lip


https://www.honeytraveler.com/multifloral-honey/ibleo-wildflower-honey-sicily/

'Smile hive' is underlined, perhaps to indicate doubt (understandably!).